Category Archives: Statistical Power

Random measurement error and the replication crisis: A statistical analysis

This is a draft of a commentary on Loken and Gelman’s Science article “Measurement error and the replication crisis. Comments are welcome.

Random Measurement Error Reduces Power, Replicability, and Observed Effect Sizes After Selection for Significance

Ulrich Schimmack and Rickard Carlsson

In the article “Measurement error and the replication crisis” Loken and Gelman (LG) “caution against the fallacy of assuming that that which does not kill statistical significance makes it stronger” (1). We agree with the overall message that it is a fallacy to interpret observed effect size estimates in small samples as accurate estimates of population effect sizes.  We think it is helpful to recognize the key role of statistical power in significance testing.  If studies have less than 50% power, effect sizes must be inflated to be significant. Thus, all observed effect sizes in these studies are inflated.  Once power is greater than 50%, it is possible to obtain significance with observed effect sizes that underestimate the population effect size. However, even with 80% power, the probability of overestimation is 62.5%. [corrected]. As studies with small samples and small effect sizes often have less than 50% power (2), we can safely assume that observed effect sizes overestimate the population effect size. The best way to make claims about effect sizes in small samples is to avoid interpreting the point estimate and to interpret the 95% confidence interval. It will often show that significant large effect sizes in small samples have wide confidence intervals that also include values close to zero, which shows that any strong claims about effect sizes in small samples are a fallacy (3).

Although we agree with Loken and Gelman’s general message, we believe that their article may have created some confusion about the effect of random measurement error in small samples with small effect sizes when they wrote “In a low-noise setting, the theoretical results of Hausman and others correctly show that measurement error will attenuate coefficient estimates. But we can demonstrate with a simple exercise that the opposite occurs in the presence of high noise and selection on statistical significance” (p. 584).  We both read this sentence as suggesting that under the specified conditions random error may produce even more inflated estimates than perfectly reliable measure. We show that this interpretation of their sentence would be incorrect and that random measurement error always leads to an underestimation of observed effect sizes, even if effect sizes are selected for significance. We demonstrate this fact with a simple equation that shows that true power before selection for significance is monotonically related to observed power after selection for significance. As random measurement error always attenuates population effect sizes, the monotonic relationship implies that observed effect sizes with unreliable measures are also always attenuated.  We provide the formula and R-Code in a Supplement. Here we just give a brief description of the steps that are involved in predicting the effect of measurement error on observed effect sizes after selection for significance.

The effect of random measurement error on population effect sizes is well known. Random measurement error adds variance to the observed measures X and Y, which lowers the observable correlation between two measures. Random error also increases the sampling error. As the non-central t-value is the proportion of these two parameters, it follows that random measurement error always attenuates power. Without selection for significance, median observed effect sizes are unbiased estimates of population effect sizes and median observed power matches true power (4,5). However, with selection for significance, non-significant results with low observed power estimates are excluded and median observed power is inflated. The amount of inflation is proportional to true power. With high power, most results are significant and inflation is small. With low power, most results are non-significant and inflation is large.

inflated-mop

Schimmack developed a formula that specifies the relationship between true power and median observed power after selection for significance (6). Figure 1 shows that median observed power after selection for significant is a monotonic function of true power.  It is straightforward to transform inflated median observed power into median observed effect sizes.  We applied this approach to Locken and Gelman’s simulation with a true population correlation of r = .15. We changed the range of sample sizes from 50 to 3050 to 25 to 1000 because this range provides a better picture of the effect of small samples on the results. We also increased the range of reliabilities to show that the results hold across a wide range of reliabilities. Figure 2 shows that random error always attenuates observed effect sizes, even after selection for significance in small samples. However, the effect is non-linear and in small samples with small effects, observed effect sizes are nearly identical for different levels of unreliability. The reason is that in studies with low power, most of the observed effect is driven by the noise in the data and it is irrelevant whether the noise is due to measurement error or unexplained reliable variance.

inflated-effect-sizes

In conclusion, we believe that our commentary clarifies how random measurement error contributes to the replication crisis.  Consistent with classic test theory, random measurement error always attenuates population effect sizes. This reduces statistical power to obtain significant results. These non-significant results typically remain unreported. The selective reporting of significant results leads to the publication of inflated effect size estimates. It would be a fallacy to consider these effect size estimates reliable and unbiased estimates of population effect sizes and to expect that an exact replication study would also produce a significant result.  The reason is that replicability is determined by true power and observed power is systematically inflated by selection for significance.  Our commentary also provides researchers with a tool to correct for the inflation by selection for significance. The function in Figure 1 can be used to deflate observed effect sizes. These deflated observed effect sizes provide more realistic estimates of population effect sizes when selection bias is present. The same approach can also be used to correct effect size estimates in meta-analyses (7).

References

1. Loken, E., & Gelman, A. (2017). Measurement error and the replication crisis. Science,

355 (6325), 584-585. [doi: 10.1126/science.aal3618]

2. Cohen, J. (1962). The statistical power of abnormal-social psychological research: A review. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 65, 145-153, http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/h004518

3. Cohen, J. (1994). The earth is round (p < .05). American Psychologist, 49, 997-1003. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0003-066X.49.12.99

4. Schimmack, U. (2012). The ironic effect of significant results on the credibility of multiple-study articles. Psychological Methods, 17(4), 551-566. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0029487

5. Schimmack, U. (2016). A revised introduction to the R-Index. https://replicationindex.wordpress.com/2016/01/31/a-revised-introduction-to-the-r-index

6. Schimmack, U. (2017). How selection for significance influences observed power. https://replicationindex.wordpress.com/2017/02/21/how-selection-for-significance-influences-observed-power/

7. van Assen, M.A., van Aert, R.C., Wicherts, J.M. (2015). Meta-analysis using effect size distributions of only statistically significant studies. Psychological Methods, 293-309. doi: 10.1037/met0000025.

################################################################

#### R-CODE ###

################################################################

### sample sizes

N = seq(25,500,5)

### true population correlation

true.pop.r = .15

### reliability

rel = 1-seq(0,.9,.20)

### create matrix of population correlations between measures X and Y.

obs.pop.r = matrix(rep(true.pop.r*rel),length(N),length(rel),byrow=TRUE)

### create a matching matrix of sample sizes

N = matrix(rep(N),length(N),length(rel))

### compute non-central t-values

ncp.t = obs.pop.r / ( (1-obs.pop.r^2)/(sqrt(N – 2)))

### compute true power

true.power = pt(ncp.t,N-2,qt(.975,N-2))

###  Get Inflated Observed Power After Selection for Significance

inf.obs.pow = pnorm(qnorm(true.power/2+(1-true.power),qnorm(true.power,qnorm(.975))),qnorm(.975))

### Transform Into Inflated Observed t-values

inf.obs.t = qt(inf.obs.pow,N-2,qt(.975,N-2))

### Transform inflated observed t-values into inflated observed effect sizes

inf.obs.es = (sqrt(N + 4*inf.obs.t^2 -2) – sqrt(N – 2))/(2*inf.obs.t)

### Set parameters for Figure

x.min = 0

x.max = 500

y.min = 0.10

y.max = 0.45

ylab = “Inflated Observed Effect Size”

title = “Effect of Selection for Significance on Observed Effect Size”

### Create Figure

for (i in 1:length(rel)) {

print(i)

plot(N[,1],inf.obs.es[,i],type=”l”,xlim=c(x.min,x.max),ylim=c(y.min,y.max),col=col[i],xlab=”Sample Size”,ylab=”Median Observed Effect Size After Selection for Significance”,lwd=3,main=title)

segments(x0 = 600,y0 = y.max-.05-i*.02, x1 = 650,col=col[i], lwd=5)

text(730,y.max-.05-i*.02,paste0(“Rel = “,format(rel[i],nsmall=1)))

par(new=TRUE)

}

abline(h = .15,lty=2)

##################### THE END #################################

How Selection for Significance Influences Observed Power

Two years ago, I posted an Excel spreadsheet to help people to understand the concept of true power, observed power, and how selection for significance inflates observed power. Two years have gone by and I have learned R. It is time to update the post.

There is no mathematical formula to correct observed power for inflation to solve for true power. This was partially the reason why I created the R-Index, which is an index of true power, but not an estimate of true power.  This has led to some confusion and misinterpretation of the R-Index (Disjointed Thought blog post).

However, it is possible to predict median observed power given true power and selection for statistical significance.  To use this method for real data with observed median power of only significant results, one can simply generate a range of true power values, generate the predicted median observed power and then pick the true power value with the smallest discrepancy between median observed power and simulated inflated power estimates. This approach is essentially the same as the approach used by pcurve and puniform, which only
differ in the criterion that is being minimized.

Here is the r-code for the conversion of true.power into the predicted observed power after selection for significance.

true.power = seq(.01,.99,.01)
obs.pow = pnorm(qnorm(true.power/2+(1-true.power),qnorm(true.power,z.crit)),z.crit)

And here is a pretty picture of the relationship between true power and inflated observed power.  As we can see, there is more inflation for low true power because observed power after selection for significance has to be greater than 50%.  With alpha = .05 (two-tailed), when the null-hypothesis is true, inflated observed power is 61%.   Thus, an observed median power of 61% for only significant results supports the null-hypothesis.  With true power of 50%, observed power is inflated to 75%.  For high true power, the inflation is relatively small. With the recommended true power of 80%, median observed power for only significant results is 86%.

inflated-mop

Observed power is easy to calculate from reported test statistics. The first step is to compute the exact two-tailed p-value.  These p-values can then be converted into observed power estimates using the standard normal distribution.

z.crit = qnorm(.975)
Obs.power = pnorm(qnorm(1-p/2),z.crit)

If there is selection for significance, you can use the previous formula to convert this observed power estimate into an estimate of true power.

This method assumes that (a) significant results are representative of the distribution and there are no additional biases (no p-hacking) and (b) all studies have the same or similar power.  This method does not work for heterogeneous sets of studies.

P.S.  It is possible to proof the formula that transforms true power into median observed power.  Another way to verify that the formula is correct is to confirm the predicted values with a simulation study.

Here is the code to run the simulation study:

n.sim = 100000
z.crit = qnorm(.975)
true.power = seq(.01,.99,.01)
obs.pow.sim = c()
for (i in 1:length(true.power)) {
z.sim = rnorm(n.sim,qnorm(true.power[i],z.crit))
med.z.sig = median(z.sim[z.sim > z.crit])
obs.pow.sim = c(obs.pow.sim,pnorm(med.z.sig,z.crit))
}
obs.pow.sim

obs.pow = pnorm(qnorm(true.power/2+(1-true.power),qnorm(true.power,z.crit)),z.crit)
obs.pow
cbind(true.power,obs.pow.sim,obs.pow)
plot(obs.pow.sim,obs.pow)

 

 

Reconstruction of a Train Wreck: How Priming Research Went off the Rails

Authors:  Ulrich Schimmack, Moritz Heene, and Kamini Kesavan

 

Abstract:
We computed the R-Index for studies cited in Chapter 4 of Kahneman’s book “Thinking Fast and Slow.” This chapter focuses on priming studies, starting with John Bargh’s study that led to Kahneman’s open email.  The results are eye-opening and jaw-dropping.  The chapter cites 12 articles and 11 of the 12 articles have an R-Index below 50.  The combined analysis of 31 studies reported in the 12 articles shows 100% significant results with average (median) observed power of 57% and an inflation rate of 43%.  The R-Index is 14. This result confirms Kahneman’s prediction that priming research is a train wreck and readers of his book “Thinking Fast and Slow” should not consider the presented studies as scientific evidence that subtle cues in their environment can have strong effects on their behavior outside their awareness.

Introduction

In 2011, Nobel Laureate Daniel Kahneman published a popular book, “Thinking Fast and Slow”, about important finding in social psychology.

In the same year, questions about the trustworthiness of social psychology were raised.  A Dutch social psychologist had fabricated data. Eventually over 50 of his articles would be retracted.  Another social psychologist published results that appeared to demonstrate the ability to foresee random future events (Bem, 2011). Few researchers believed these results and statistical analysis suggested that the results were not trustworthy (Francis, 2012; Schimmack, 2012).  Psychologists started to openly question the credibility of published results.

In the beginning of 2012, Doyen and colleagues published a failure to replicate a prominent study by John Bargh that was featured in Daniel Kahneman’s book.  A few month later, Daniel Kahneman distanced himself from Bargh’s research in an open email addressed to John Bargh (Young, 2012):

“As all of you know, of course, questions have been raised about the robustness of priming results…. your field is now the poster child for doubts about the integrity of psychological research… people have now attached a question mark to the field, and it is your responsibility to remove it… all I have personally at stake is that I recently wrote a book that emphasizes priming research as a new approach to the study of associative memory…Count me as a general believer… My reason for writing this letter is that I see a train wreck looming.”

Five years later, Kahneman’s concerns have been largely confirmed. Major studies in social priming research have failed to replicate and the replicability of results in social psychology is estimated to be only 25% (OSC, 2015).

Looking back, it is difficult to understand the uncritical acceptance of social priming as a fact.  In “Thinking Fast and Slow” Kahneman wrote “disbelief is not an option. The results are not made up, nor are they statistical flukes. You have no choice but to accept that the major conclusions of these studies are true.”

Yet, Kahneman could have seen the train wreck coming. In 1971, he co-authored an article about scientists’ “exaggerated confidence in the validity of conclusions based on small samples” (Tversky & Kahneman, 1971, p. 105).  Yet, many of the studies described in Kahneman’s book had small samples.  For example, Bargh’s priming study used only 30 undergraduate students to demonstrate the effect.

Replicability Index

Small samples can be sufficient to detect large effects. However, small effects require large samples.  The probability of replicating a published finding is a function of sample size and effect size.  The Replicability Index (R-Index) makes it possible to use information from published results to predict how replicable published results are.

Every reported test-statistic can be converted into an estimate of power, called observed power. For a single study, this estimate is useless because it is not very precise. However, for sets of studies, the estimate becomes more precise.  If we have 10 studies and the average power is 55%, we would expect approximately 5 to 6 studies with significant results and 4 to 5 studies with non-significant results.

If we observe 100% significant results with an average power of 55%, it is likely that studies with non-significant results are missing (Schimmack, 2012).  There are too many significant results.  This is especially true because average power is also inflated when researchers report only significant results. Consequently, the true power is even lower than average observed power.  If we observe 100% significant results with 55% average powered power, power is likely to be less than 50%.

This is unacceptable. Tversky and Kahneman (1971) wrote “we refuse to believe that a serious investigator will knowingly accept a .50 risk of failing to confirm a valid research hypothesis.”

To correct for the inflation in power, the R-Index uses the inflation rate. For example, if all studies are significant and average power is 75%, the inflation rate is 25% points.  The R-Index subtracts the inflation rate from average power.  So, with 100% significant results and average observed power of 75%, the R-Index is 50% (75% – 25% = 50%).  The R-Index is not a direct estimate of true power. It is actually a conservative estimate of true power if the R-Index is below 50%.  Thus, an R-Index below 50% suggests that a significant result was obtained only by capitalizing on chance, although it is difficult to quantify by how much.

How Replicable are the Social Priming Studies in “Thinking Fast and Slow”?

Chapter 4: The Associative Machine

4.1.  Cognitive priming effect

In the 1980s, psychologists discovered that exposure to a word causes immediate and measurable changes in the ease with which many related words can be evoked.

[no reference provided]

4.2.  Priming of behavior without awareness

Another major advance in our understanding of memory was the discovery that priming is not restricted to concepts and words. You cannot know this from conscious experience, of course, but you must accept the alien idea that your actions and your emotions can be primed by events of which you are not even aware.

“In an experiment that became an instant classic, the psychologist John Bargh and his collaborators asked students at New York University—most aged eighteen to twenty-two—to assemble four-word sentences from a set of five words (for example, “finds he it yellow instantly”). For one group of students, half the scrambled sentences contained words associated with the elderly, such as Florida, forgetful, bald, gray, or wrinkle. When they had completed that task, the young participants were sent out to do another experiment in an office down the hall. That short walk was what the experiment was about. The researchers unobtrusively measured the time it took people to get from one end of the corridor to the other.”

“As Bargh had predicted, the young people who had fashioned a sentence from words with an elderly theme walked down the hallway significantly more slowly than the others. walking slowly, which is associated with old age.”

“All this happens without any awareness. When they were questioned afterward, none of the students reported noticing that the words had had a common theme, and they all insisted that nothing they did after the first experiment could have been influenced by the words they had encountered. The idea of old age had not come to their conscious awareness, but their actions had changed nevertheless.“

[John A. Bargh, Mark Chen, and Lara Burrows, “Automaticity of Social Behavior: Direct Effects of Trait Construct and Stereotype Activation on Action,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 71 (1996): 230–44.]

t(28)=2.86 0.008 2.66 0.76
t(28)=2.16 0.039 2.06 0.54

MOP = .65, Inflation = .35, R-Index = .30

4.3.  Reversed priming: Behavior primes cognitions

“The ideomotor link also works in reverse. A study conducted in a German university was the mirror image of the early experiment that Bargh and his colleagues had carried out in New York.”

“Students were asked to walk around a room for 5 minutes at a rate of 30 steps per minute, which was about one-third their normal pace. After this brief experience, the participants were much quicker to recognize words related to old age, such as forgetful, old, and lonely.”

“Reciprocal priming effects tend to produce a coherent reaction: if you were primed to think of old age, you would tend to act old, and acting old would reinforce the thought of old age.”

t(18)=2.10 0.050 1.96 0.50
t(35)=2.10 0.043 2.02 0.53
t(31)=2.50 0.018 2.37 0.66

MOP = .53, Inflation = .47, R-Index = .06

4.4.  Facial-feedback hypothesis (smiling makes you happy)

“Reciprocal links are common in the associative network. For example, being amused tends to make you smile, and smiling tends to make you feel amused….”

“College students were asked to rate the humor of cartoons from Gary Larson’s The Far Side while holding a pencil in their mouth. Those who were “smiling” (without any awareness of doing so) found the cartoons funnier than did those who were “frowning.”

[“Inhibiting and Facilitating Conditions of the Human Smile: A Nonobtrusive Test of the Facial Feedback Hypothesis,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 54 (1988): 768–77.]

The authors used the more liberal and unconventional criterion of p < .05 (one-tailed), z = 1.65, as a criterion for significance. Accordingly, we adjusted the R-Index analysis and used 1.65 as the criterion value.

t(89)=1.85 0.034 1.83 0.57
t(75)=1.78 0.034 1.83 0.57

MOP = .57, Inflation = .43, R-Index = .14

These results could not be replicated in a large replication effort with 17 independent labs. Not a single lab produced a significant result and even a combined analysis failed to show any evidence for the effect.

4.5. Automatic Facial Responses

In another experiment, people whose face was shaped into a frown (by squeezing their eyebrows together) reported an enhanced emotional response to upsetting pictures—starving children, people arguing, maimed accident victims.

[Ulf Dimberg, Monika Thunberg, and Sara Grunedal, “Facial Reactions to

Emotional Stimuli: Automatically Controlled Emotional Responses,” Cognition and Emotion, 16 (2002): 449–71.]

The description in the book does not match any of the three studies reported in this article. The first two studies examined facial muscle movements in response to pictures of facial expressions (smiling or frowning faces).  The third study used emotional pictures of snakes and flowers. We might consider the snake pictures as being equivalent to pictures of starving children or maimed accident victims.  Participants were also asked to frown or to smile while looking at the pictures. However, the dependent variable was not how they felt in response to pictures of snakes, but rather how their facial muscles changed.  Aside from a strong effect of instructions, the study also found that the emotional picture had an automatic effect on facial muscles.  Participants frowned more when instructed to frown and looking at a snake picture than when instructed to frown and looking at a picture of a flower. “This response, however, was larger to snakes than to flowers as indicated by both the Stimulus factor, F(1, 47) = 6.66, p < .02, and the Stimulus 6 Interval factor, F(1, 47) = 4.30, p < .05.”  (p. 463). The evidence for smiling was stronger. “The zygomatic major muscle response was larger to flowers than to snakes, which was indicated by both the Stimulus factor, F(1, 47) = 18.03, p < .001, and the Stimulus 6 Interval factor, F(1, 47) = 16.78, p < .001.”  No measures of subjective experiences were included in this study.  Therefore, the results of this study provide no evidence for Kahneman’s claim in the book and the results of this study are not included in our analysis.

4.6.  Effects of Head-Movements on Persuasion

“Simple, common gestures can also unconsciously influence our thoughts and feelings.”

“In one demonstration, people were asked to listen to messages through new headphones. They were told that the purpose of the experiment was to test the quality of the audio equipment and were instructed to move their heads repeatedly to check for any distortions of sound. Half the participants were told to nod their head up and down while others were told to shake it side to side. The messages they heard were radio editorials.”

“Those who nodded (a yes gesture) tended to accept the message they heard, but those who shook their head tended to reject it. Again, there was no awareness, just a habitual connection between an attitude of rejection or acceptance and its common physical expression.”

F(2,66)=44.70 0.000 7.22 1.00

MOP = 1.00, Inflation = .00,  R-Index = 1.00

[Gary L. Wells and Richard E. Petty, “The Effects of Overt Head Movements on Persuasion: Compatibility and Incompatibility of Responses,” Basic and Applied Social Psychology, 1, (1980): 219–30.]

4.7   Location as Prime

“Our vote should not be affected by the location of the polling station, for example, but it is.”

“A study of voting patterns in precincts of Arizona in 2000 showed that the support for propositions to increase the funding of schools was significantly greater when the polling station was in a school than when it was in a nearby location.”

“A separate experiment showed that exposing people to images of classrooms and school lockers also increased the tendency of participants to support a school initiative. The effect of the images was larger than the difference between parents and other voters!”

[Jonah Berger, Marc Meredith, and S. Christian Wheeler, “Contextual Priming: Where People Vote Affects How They Vote,” PNAS 105 (2008): 8846–49.]

z = 2.10 0.036 2.10 0.56
p = .05 0.050 1.96 0.50

MOP = .53, Inflation = .47, R-Index = .06

4.8  Money Priming

“Reminders of money produce some troubling effects.”

“Participants in one experiment were shown a list of five words from which they were required to construct a four-word phrase that had a money theme (“high a salary desk paying” became “a high-paying salary”).”

“Other primes were much more subtle, including the presence of an irrelevant money-related object in the background, such as a stack of Monopoly money on a table, or a computer with a screen saver of dollar bills floating in water.”

“Money-primed people become more independent than they would be without the associative trigger. They persevered almost twice as long in trying to solve a very difficult problem before they asked the experimenter for help, a crisp demonstration of increased self-reliance.”

“Money-primed people are also more selfish: they were much less willing to spend time helping another student who pretended to be confused about an experimental task. When an experimenter clumsily dropped a bunch of pencils on the floor, the participants with money (unconsciously) on their mind picked up fewer pencils.”

“In another experiment in the series, participants were told that they would shortly have a get-acquainted conversation with another person and were asked to set up two chairs while the experimenter left to retrieve that person. Participants primed by money chose to stay much farther apart than their nonprimed peers (118 vs. 80 centimeters).”

“Money-primed undergraduates also showed a greater preference for being alone.”

[Kathleen D. Vohs, “The Psychological Consequences of Money,” Science 314 (2006): 1154–56.]

F(2,49)=3.73 0.031 2.16 0.58
t(35)=2.03 0.050 1.96 0.50
t(37)=2.06 0.046 1.99 0.51
t(42)=2.13 0.039 2.06 0.54
F(2,32)=4.34 0.021 2.30 0.63
t(38)=2.13 0.040 2.06 0.54
t(33)=2.37 0.024 2.26 0.62
F(2,58)=4.04 0.023 2.28 0.62
chi^2(2)=10.10 0.006 2.73 0.78

MOP = .58, Inflation = .42, R-Index = .16

4.9  Death Priming

“The evidence of priming studies suggests that reminding people of their mortality increases the appeal of authoritarian ideas, which may become reassuring in the context of the terror of death.”

The cited article does not directly examine this question.  The abstract states that “three experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis, derived from terror management theory, that reminding people of their mortality increases attraction to those who consensually validate their beliefs and decreases attraction to those who threaten their beliefs” (p. 308).  Study 2 found no general effect of death priming. Rather, the effect was qualified by authoritarianism. Mortality salience enhanced the rejection of dissimilar others in Study 2 only among high authoritarian subjects.” (p. 314), based on a three-way interaction with F(1,145) = 4.08, p = .045.  We used the three-way interaction for the computation of the R-Index.  Study 1 reported opposite effects for ratings of Christian targets, t(44) = 2.18, p = .034 and Jewish targets, t(44)= 2.08, p = .043. As these tests are dependent, only one test could be used, and we chose the slightly stronger result.  Similarly, Study 3 reported significantly more liking of a positive interviewee and less liking of a negative interviewee, t(51) = 2.02, p = .049 and t(49) = 2.42, p = .019, respectively. We chose the stronger effect.

[Jeff Greenberg et al., “Evidence for Terror Management Theory II: The Effect of Mortality Salience on Reactions to Those Who Threaten or Bolster the Cultural Worldview,” Journal of Personality and Social Psychology]

t(44)=2.18 0.035 2.11 0.56
F(1,145)=4.08 0.045 2.00 0.52
t(49)=2.42 0.019 2.34 0.65

MOP = .56, Inflation = .44, R-Index = .12

4.10  The “Lacy Macbeth Effect”

“For example, consider the ambiguous word fragments W_ _ H and S_ _ P. People who were recently asked to think of an action of which they are ashamed are more likely to complete those fragments as WASH and SOAP and less likely to see WISH and SOUP.”

“Furthermore, merely thinking about stabbing a coworker in the back leaves people more inclined to buy soap, disinfectant, or detergent than batteries, juice, or candy bars. Feeling that one’s soul is stained appears to trigger a desire to cleanse one’s body, an impulse that has been dubbed the “Lady Macbeth effect.”

[Lady Macbeth effect”: Chen-Bo Zhong and Katie Liljenquist, “Washing Away Your Sins:

Threatened Morality and Physical Cleansing,” Science 313 (2006): 1451–52.]

F(1,58)=4.26 0.044 2.02 0.52
F(1,25)=6.99 0.014 2.46 0.69

MOP = .61, Inflation = .39, R-Index = .22

The article reports two more studies that are not explicitly mentioned, but are used as empirical support for the Lady Macbeth effect. As the results of these studies were similar to those in the mentioned studies, including these tests in our analysis does not alter the conclusions.

chi^2(1)=4.57 0.033 2.14 0.57
chi^2(1)=5.02 0.025 2.24 0.61

MOP = .59, Inflation = .41, R-Index = .18

4.11  Modality Specificity of the “Lacy Macbeth Effect”

“Participants in an experiment were induced to “lie” to an imaginary person, either on the phone or in e-mail. In a subsequent test of the desirability of various products, people who had lied on the phone preferred mouthwash over soap, and those who had lied in e-mail preferred soap to mouthwash.”

[Spike Lee and Norbert Schwarz, “Dirty Hands and Dirty Mouths: Embodiment of the Moral-Purity Metaphor Is Specific to the Motor Modality Involved in Moral Transgression,” Psychological Science 21 (2010): 1423–25.]

The results are presented as significant with a one-sided t-test. “As shown in Figure 1a, participants evaluated mouthwash more positively after lying in a voice mail (M = 0.21, SD = 0.72) than after lying in an e-mail (M = –0.26, SD = 0.94), F(1, 81) = 2.93, p = .03 (one-tailed), d = 0.55 (simple main effect), but evaluated hand sanitizer more positively after lying in an e-mail (M = 0.31, SD = 0.76) than after lying in a voice mail (M = –0.12, SD = 0.86), F(1, 81) = 3.25, p = .04 (one-tailed), d = 0.53 (simple main effect).”  We adjusted the significance criterion for the R-Index accordingly.

F(1,81)=2.93 0.045 1.69 0.52
F(1,81)=3.25 0.038 1.78 0.55

MOP = .54, Inflation = .46, R-Index = .08

4.12   Eyes on You

“On the first week of the experiment (which you can see at the bottom of the figure), two wide-open eyes stare at the coffee or tea drinkers, whose average contribution was 70 pence per liter of milk. On week 2, the poster shows flowers and average contributions drop to about 15 pence. The trend continues. On average, the users of the kitchen contributed almost three times as much in ’eye weeks’ as they did in ’flower weeks.’ ”

[Melissa Bateson, Daniel Nettle, and Gilbert Roberts, “Cues of Being Watched Enhance Cooperation in a Real-World Setting,” Biology Letters 2 (2006): 412–14.]

F(1,7)=11.55 0.011 2.53 0.72

MOP = .72, Inflation = .28, R-Index = .44

Combined Analysis

We then combined the results from the 31 studies mentioned above.  While the R-Index for small sets of studies may underestimate replicability, the R-Index for a large set of studies is more accurate.  Median Obesrved Power for all 31 studies is only 57%. It is incredible that 31 studies with 57% power could produce 100% significant results (Schimmack, 2012). Thus, there is strong evidence that the studies provide an overly optimistic image of the robustness of social priming effects.  Moreover, median observed power overestimates true power if studies were selected to be significant. After correcting for inflation, the R-Index is well below 50%.  This suggests that the studies have low replicability. Moreover, it is possible that some of the reported results are actually false positive results.  Just like the large-scale replication of the facial feedback studies failed to provide any support for the original findings, other studies may fail to show any effects in large replication projects. As a result, readers of “Thinking Fast and Slow” should be skeptical about the reported results and they should disregard Kahneman’s statement that “you have no choice but to accept that the major conclusions of these studies are true.”  Our analysis actually leads to the opposite conclusion. “You should not accept any of the conclusions of these studies as true.”

k = 31,  MOP = .57, Inflation = .43, R-Index = .14,  Grade: F for Fail

Powergraph of Chapter 4kfs

Schimmack and Brunner (2015) developed an alternative method for the estimation of replicability.  This method takes into account that power can vary across studies. It also provides 95% confidence intervals for the replicability estimate.  The results of this method are presented in the Figure above. The replicability estimate is similar to the R-Index, with 14% replicability.  However, due to the small set of studies, the 95% confidence interval is wide and includes values above 50%. This does not mean that we can trust the published results, but it does suggest that some of the published results might be replicable in larger replication studies with more power to detect small effects.  At the same time, the graph shows clear evidence for a selection effect.  That is, published studies in these articles do not provide a representative picture of all the studies that were conducted.  The powergraph shows that there should have been a lot more non-significant results than were reported in the published articles.  The selective reporting of studies that worked is at the core of the replicability crisis in social psychology (Sterling, 1959, Sterling et al., 1995; Schimmack, 2012).  To clean up their act and to regain trust in published results, social psychologists have to conduct studies with larger samples that have more than 50% power (Tversky & Kahneman, 1971) and they have to stop reporting only significant results.  We can only hope that social psychologists will learn from the train wreck of social priming research and improve their research practices.

Are Most Published Results in Psychology False? An Empirical Study

Why Most Published Research Findings  are False by John P. A. Ioannidis

In 2005, John P. A. Ioannidis wrote an influential article with the title “Why Most Published Research Findings are False.” The article starts with the observation that “there is increasing concern that most current published research findings are false” (e124). Later on, however, the concern becomes a fact. “It can be proven that most claimed research findings are false” (e124). It is not surprising that an article that claims to have proof for such a stunning claim has received a lot of attention (2,199 citations and 399 citations in 2016 alone in Web of Science).

Most citing articles focus on the possibility that many or even more than half of all published results could be false. Few articles cite Ioannidis to make the factual statement that most published results are false, and there appears to be no critical examination of Ioannidis’s simulations that he used to support his claim.

This blog post shows that these simulations make questionable assumptions and shows with empirical data that Ioannidis’s simulations are inconsistent with actual data.

Critical Examination of Ioannidis’s Simulations

First, it is important to define what a false finding is. In many sciences, a finding is published when a statistical test produced a significant result (p < .05). For example, a drug trial may show a significant difference between a drug and a placebo control condition with a p-value of .02. This finding is then interpreted as evidence for the effectiveness of the drug.

How could this published finding be false? The logic of significance testing makes this clear. The only inference that is being made is that the population effect size (i.e., the effect size that could be obtained if the same experiment were repeated with an infinite number of participants) is different from zero and in the same direction as the one observed in the study. Thus, the claim that most significant results are false implies that in more than 50% of all published significant results the null-hypothesis was true. That is, a false positive result was reported.

Ioannidis then introduces the positive predictive value (PPV). The positive predictive value is the proportion of positive results (p < .05) that are true positives.

(1) PPV = TP/(TP + FP)

PTP = True Positive Results, FP = False Positive Results

The proportion of true positive results (TP) depends on the percentage of true hypothesis (PTH) and the probability of producing a significant result when a hypothesis is true. This probability is known as statistical power. Statistical power is typically defined as 1 minus the type-II error (beta).

(2) TP = PTH * Power = PTH * (1 – beta)

The probability of a false positive result depends on the proportion of false hypotheses (PFH) and the criterion for significance (alpha).

(3) FP = PFH * alpha

This means that the actual proportion of true significant results is a function of the ratio of true and false hypotheses (PTH:PFH), power, and alpha.

(4) PPV = (PTH*power) / ((PTH*power) + (PFH * alpha))

Ioannidis translates his claim that most published findings are false into a PPV below 50%. This would mean that the null-hypothesis is true in more than 50% of published results that falsely rejected it.

(5) (PTH*power) / ((PTH*power) + (PFH * alpha))  < .50

Equation (5) can be simplied to the inequality equation

(6) alpha > PTH/PFH * power

We can rearrange formula (6) and substitute PFH with (1-PHT) to determine the maximum proportion of true hypotheses to produce over 50% false positive results.

(7a)  =  alpha = PTH/(1-PTH) * power

(7b) = alpha*(1-PTH) = PTH * power

(7c) = alpha – PTH*alpha = PTH * power

(7d) =  alpha = PTH*alpha + PTH*power

(7e) = alpha = PTH(alpha + power)

(7f) =  alpha/(power + alpha) = PTH

 

Table 1 shows the results.

Power                  PTH / PFH             
90%                       5  / 95
80%                       6  / 94
70%                       7  / 93
60%                       8  / 92
50%                       9  / 91
40%                      11 / 89
30%                       14 / 86
20%                      20 / 80
10%                       33 / 67                     

Even if researchers would conduct studies with only 20% power to discover true positive results, we would only obtain more than 50% false positive results if only 20% of hypothesis were true. This makes it rather implausible that most published results could be false.

To justify his bold claim, Ioannidis introduces the notion of bias. Bias can be introduced due to various questionable research practices that help researchers to report significant results. The main effect of these practices is that the probability of a false positive result to become significant increases.

Simmons et al. (2011) showed that massive use several questionable research practices (p-hacking) can increase the risk of a false positive result from the nominal 5% to 60%. If we assume that bias is rampant and substitute the nominal alpha of 5% with an assumed alpha of 50%, fewer false hypotheses are needed to produce more false than true positives (Table 2).

Power                 PTH/PFH             
90%                     40 / 60
80%                     43 / 57
70%                     46 / 54
60%                     50 / 50
50%                     55 / 45
40%                     60 / 40
30%                     67 / 33
20%                     75 / 25
10%                      86 / 14                    

If we assume that bias inflates the risk of type-I errors from 5% to 60%, it is no longer implausible that most research findings are false. In fact, more than 50% of published results would be false if researchers tested hypothesis with 50% power and 50% of tested hypothesis are false.

However, the calculations in Table 2 ignore the fact that questionable research practices that inflate false positives also decrease the rate of false negatives. For example, a researcher who continues testing until a significant result is obtained, increases the chances of obtaining a significant result no matter whether the hypothesis is true or false.

Ioannidis recognizes this, but he assumes that bias has the same effect for true hypothesis and false hypothesis. This assumption is questionable because it is easier to produce a significant result if an effect exists than if no effect exists. Ioannidis’s assumption implies that bias increases the proportion of false positive results a lot more than the proportion of true positive results.

For example, if power is 50%, only 50% of true hypothesis produce a significant result. However, with a bias factor of .4, another 40% of the false negative results will become significant, adding another .4*.5 = 20% true positive results to the number of true positive results. This gives a total of 70% positive results, which is a 40% increase over the number of positive results that would have been obtained without bias. However, this increase in true positive results pales in comparison to the effect that 40% bias has on the rate of false positives. As there are 95% true negatives, 40% bias produces another .95*.40 = 38% of false positive results. So instead of 5% false positive results, bias increases the percentage of false positive results from 5% to 43%, an increase by 760%. Thus, the effect of bias on the PPV is not equal. A 40% increase of false positives has a much stronger impact on the PPV than a 40% increase of true positives. Ioannidis provides no rational for this bias model.

A bigger concern is that Ioannidis makes sweeping claims about the proportion of false published findings based on untested assumptions about the proportion of null-effects, statistical power, and the amount of bias due to questionable research practices.
For example, he suggests that 4 out of 5 discoveries in adequately powered (80% power) exploratory epidemiological studies are false positives (PPV = .20). To arrive at this estimate, he assumes that only 1 out of 11 hypotheses is true and that for every 1000 studies, bias adds only 1000* .30*.10*.20 = 6 true positives results compared to 1000* .30*.90*.95 = 265 false positive results (i.e., 44:1 ratio). The assumed bias turns a PPV of 62% without bias into a PPV of 20% with bias. These untested assumptions are used to support the claim that “simulations show that for most study designs and settings, it is more likely for a research claim to be false than true.” (e124).

Many of these assumptions can be challenged. For example, statisticians have pointed out that the null-hypothesis is unlikely to be true in most studies (Cohen, 1994). This does not mean that all published results are true, but Ioannidis’ claims rest on the opposite assumption that most hypothesis are a priori false. This makes little sense when the a priori hypothesis is specified as a null-effect and even a small effect size is sufficient for a hypothesis to be correct.

Ioannidis also ignores attempts to estimate the typical power of studies (Cohen, 1962). At least in psychology, the typical power is estimated to be around 50%. As shown in Table 2, even massive bias would still produce more true than false positive results, if the null-hypothesis is false in no more than 50% of all statistical tests.

In conclusion, Ioannidis’s claim that most published results are false depends heavily on untested assumptions and cannot be considered a factual assessment of the actual number of false results in published journals.

Testing Ioannidis’s Simulations

10 years after the publication of “Why Most Published Research Findings Are False,”  it is possible to put Ioannidis’s simulations to an empirical test. Powergraphs (Schimmack, 2015) can be used to estimate the average replicability of published test results. For this purpose, each test statistic is converted into a z-value. A powergraph is foremost a histogram of z-values. The distribution of z-values provides information about the average statistical power of published results because studies with higher power produce higher z-values.

Figure 1 illustrates the distribution of z-values that is expected for Ioanndis’s model for “adequately powered exploratory epidemiological study” (Simulation 6 in Figure 4). Ioannidis assumes that for every true positive, there are 10 false positives (R = 1:10). He also assumed that studies have 80% power to detect a true positive. In addition, he assumed 30% bias.

ioannidis-fig6

A 30% bias implies that for every 100 false hypotheses, there would be 33 (100*[.30*.95+.05]) rather than 5 false positive results (.95*.30+.05)/.95). The effect on false negatives is much smaller (100*[.30*.20 + .80]). Bias was modeled by increasing the number of attempts to produce a significant result so that proportion of true and false hypothesis matched the predicted proportions. Given an assumed 1:10 ratio of true to false hypothesis, the ratio is 335 false hypotheses to 86 true hypotheses. The simulation assumed that researchers tested 100,000 false hypotheses and observed 35000 false positive results and that they tested 10,000 true hypotheses and observed 8,600 true positive results. Bias was simulated by increasing the number of tests to produce the predicted ratio of true and false positive results.

Figure 1 only shows significant results because only significant results would be reported as positive results. Figure 1 shows that a high proportion of z-values are in the range between 1.95 (p = .05) and 3 (p = .001). Powergraphs use z-curve (Schimmack & Brunner, 2016) to estimate the probability that an exact replication study would replicate a significant result. In this simulation, this probability is a mixture of false positives and studies with 80% power. The true average probability is 20%. The z-curve estimate is 21%. Z-curve can also estimate the replicability for other sets of studies. The figure on the right shows replicability for studies that produced an observed z-score greater than 3 (p < .001). The estimate shows an average replicability of 59%. Thus, researchers can increase the chance of replicating published findings by adjusting the criterion value and ignoring significant results with p-values greater than p = .001, even if they were reported as significant with p < .05.

Figure 2 shows the distribution of z-values for Ioannidis’s example of a research program that produces more true than false positives, PPV = .85 (Simulation 1 in Table 4).

ioannidis-fig1

Visual inspection of Figure 1 and Figure 2 is sufficient to show that a robust research program produces a dramatically different distribution of z-values. The distribution of z-values in Figure 2 and a replicability estimate of 67% are impossible if most of the published significant results were false.  The maximum value that could be obtained is obtained with a PPV of 50% and 100% power for the true positive results, which yields a replicability estimate of .05*.50 + 1*.50 = 55%. As power is much lower than 100%, the real maximum value is below 50%.

The powergraph on the right shows the replicability estimate for tests that produced a z-value greater than 3 (p < .001). As only a small proportion of false positives are included in this set, z-curve correctly estimates the average power of these studies as 80%. These examples demonstrate that it is possible to test Ioannidis’s claim that most published (significant) results are false empirically. The distribution of test results provides relevant information about the proportion of false positives and power. If actual data are more similar to the distribution in Figure 1, it is possible that most published results are false positives, although it is impossible to distinguish false positives from false negatives with extremely low power. In contrast, if data look more like those in Figure 2, the evidence would contradict Ioannidis’s bold and unsupported claim that most published results are false.

The maximum replicabiltiy that could be obtained with 50% false-positives would require that the true positive studies have 100% power. In this case, replicability would be .50*.05 + .50*1 = 52.5%.  However, 100% power is unrealistic. Figure 3 shows the distribution for a scenario with 90% power and 100% bias and an equal percentage of true and false hypotheses. The true replicabilty for this scenario is .05*.50 + .90 * .50 = 47.5%. z-curve slightly overestimates replicabilty and produced an estimate of 51%.  Even 90% power is unlikely in a real set of data. Thus, replicability estimates above 50% are inconsistent with Ioannidis’s hypothesis that most published positive results are false.  Moreover, the distribution of z-values greater than 3 is also informative. If positive results are a mixture of many false positive results and true positive results with high power, the replicabilty estimate for z-values greater than 3 should be high. In contrast, if this estimate is not much higher than the estimate for all z-values, it suggest that there is a high proportion of studies that produced true positive results with low power.

ioannidis-fig3

Empirical Evidence

I have produced powergraphs and replicability estimates for over 100 psychology journals (2015 Replicabilty Rankings). Not a single journal produced a replicability estimate below 50%. Below are a few selected examples.

The Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition publishes results from cognitive psychology. In 2015, a replication project (OSC, 2015) demonstrated that 50% of significant results produced a significant result in a replication study. It is unlikely that all non-significant results were false positives. Thus, the results show that Ioannidis’s claim that most published results are false does not apply to results published in this journal.

Powergraphs for JEP-LMC3.g

The powergraphs further support this conclusion. The graphs look a lot more like Figure 2 than Figure 1 and the replicability estimate is even higher than the one expected from Ioannidis’s simulation with a PPV of 85%.

Another journal that was subjected to replication attempts was Psychological Science. The success rate for Psychological Science was below 50%. However, it is important to keep in mind that a non-significant result in a replication study does not prove that the original result was a false positive. Thus, the PPV could still be greater than 50%.

Powergraphs for PsySci3.g

The powergraph for Psychological Science shows more z-values in the range between 2 and 3 (p > .001). Nevertheless, the replicability estimate is comparable to the one in Figure 2 which simulated a high PPV of 85%. Closer inspection of the results published in this journal would be required to determine whether a PPV below .50 is plausible.

The third journal that was subjected to a replication attempt was the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. The journal has three sections, but I focus on the Attitude and Social Cognition section because many replication studies were from this section. The success rate of replication studies was only 25%. However, there is controversy about the reason for this high number of failed replications and once more it is not clear what percentage of failed replications were due to false positive results in the original studies.

Powergraphs for JPSP-ASC3.g

One problem with the journal rankings is that they are based on automated extraction of all test results. Ioannidis might argue that his claim focused only on test results that tested an original, novel, or an important finding, whereas articles also often report significance tests for other effects. For example, an intervention study may show a strong decrease in depression, when only the interaction with treatment is theoretically relevant.

I am currently working on powergraphs that are limited to theoretically important statistical tests. These results may show lower replicability estimates. Thus, it remains to be seen how consistent Ioannidis’s predictions are for tests of novel and original hypotheses. Powergraphs provide a valuable tool to address this important question.

Moreover, powergraphs can be used to examine whether science is improving. So far, powergraphs of psychology journals have shown no systematic improvement in response to concerns about high false positive rates in published journals. The powergraphs for 2016 will be published soon. Stay tuned.

 

Subjective Bayesian T-Test Code

########################################################

rm(list=ls()) #will remove ALL objects

##############################################################
Bayes-Factor Calculations for T-tests
##############################################################

#Start of Settings

### Give a title for results output
Results.Title = ‘Normal(x,0,.5) N = 100 BS-Design, Obs.ES = 0′

### Criterion for Inference in Favor of H0, BF (H1/H0)
BF.crit.H0 = 1/3

### Criterion for Inference in Favor of H1
#set z.crit.H1 to Infinity to use Bayes-Factor, BF(H1/H0)
BF.crit.H1 = 3
z.crit.H1 = Inf

### Set Number of Groups
gr = 2

### Set Total Sample size
N = 100

### Set observed effect size
### for between-subject designs and one sample designs this is Cohen’s d
### for within-subject designs this is dz
obs.es = 0

### Set the mode of the alternative hypothesis
alt.mode = 0

### Set the variability of the alternative hypothesis
alt.var = .5

### Set the shape of the distribution of population effect sizes
alt.dist = 2  #1 = Cauchy; 2 = Normal

### Set the lower bound of population effect sizes
### Set to zero if there is zero probability to observe effects with the opposite sign
low = -3

### Set the upper bound of population effect sizes
### For example, set to 1, if you think effect sizes greater than 1 SD are unlikely
high = 3

### set the precision of density estimation (bigger takes longer)
precision = 100

### set the graphic resolution (higher resolution takes longer)
graphic.resolution = 20

### set limit for non-central t-values
nct.limit = 100

################################
# End of Settings
################################

# compute degrees of freedom
df = (N – gr)

# get range of population effect sizes
pop.es=seq(low,high,(1/precision))

# compute sampling error
se = gr/sqrt(N)

# limit population effect sizes based on non-central t-values
pop.es = pop.es[pop.es/se >= -nct.limit & pop.es/se <= nct.limit]

# function to get weights for Cauchy or Normal Distributions
get.weights=function(pop.es,alt.dist,p) {
if (alt.dist == 1) w = dcauchy(pop.es,alt.mode,alt.var)
if (alt.dist == 2) w = dnorm(pop.es,alt.mode,alt.var)
sum(w)
# get the scaling factor to scale weights to 1*precision
#scale = sum(w)/precision
# scale weights
#w = w / scale
return(w)
}

# get weights for population effect sizes
weights = get.weights(pop.es,alt.dist,precision)

#Plot Alternative Hypothesis
Title=”Alternative Hypothesis”
ymax=max(max(weights)*1.2,1)
plot(pop.es,weights,type=’l’,ylim=c(0,ymax),xlab=”Population Effect Size”,ylab=”Density”,main=Title,col=’blue’,lwd=3)
abline(v=0,col=’red’)

#create observations for plotting of prediction distributions
obs = seq(low,high,1/graphic.resolution)

# Get distribution for observed effect size assuming H1
H1.dist = as.numeric(lapply(obs, function(x) sum(dt(x/se,df,pop.es/se) * weights)/precision))

#Get Distribution for observed effect sizes assuming H0
H0.dist = dt(obs/se,df,0)

#Compute Bayes-Factors for Prediction Distribution of H0 and H1
BFs = H1.dist/H0.dist

#Compute z-scores (strength of evidence against H0)
z = qnorm(pt(obs/se,df,log.p=TRUE),log.p=TRUE)

# Compute H1 error rate rate
BFpos = BFs
BFpos[z < 0] = Inf
if (z.crit.H1 == Inf) z.crit.H1 = abs(z[which(abs(BFpos-BF.crit.H1) == min(abs(BFpos-BF.crit.H1)))])
ncz = qnorm(pt(pop.es/se,df,log.p=TRUE),log.p=TRUE)
weighted.power = sum(pnorm(abs(ncz),z.crit.H1)*weights)/sum(weights)
H1.error = 1-weighted.power

#Compute H0 Error Rate
z.crit.H0 = abs(z[which(abs(BFpos-BF.crit.H0) == min(abs(BFpos-BF.crit.H0)))])
H0.error = (1-pnorm(z.crit.H0))*2

# Get density for observed effect size assuming H0
Density.Obs.H0 = dt(obs.es,df,0)

# Get density for observed effect size assuming H1
Density.Obs.H1 = sum(dt(obs.es/se,df,pop.es/se) * weights)/precision

# Compute Bayes-Factor for observed effect size
BF.obs.es = Density.Obs.H1 / Density.Obs.H0

#Compute z-score for observed effect size
obs.z = qnorm(pt(obs.es/se,df,log.p=TRUE),log.p=TRUE)

#Show Results
ymax=max(H0.dist,H1.dist)*1.3
plot(type=’l’,z,H0.dist,ylim=c(0,ymax),xlab=”Strength of Evidence (z-value)”,ylab=”Density”,main=Results.Title,col=’black’,lwd=2)
par(new=TRUE)
plot(type=’l’,z,H1.dist,ylim=c(0,ymax),xlab=””,ylab=””,col=’blue’,lwd=2)
abline(v=obs.z,lty=2,lwd=2,col=’darkgreen’)
abline(v=-z.crit.H1,col=’blue’,lty=3)
abline(v=z.crit.H1,col=’blue’,lty=3)
abline(v=-z.crit.H0,col=’red’,lty=3)
abline(v=z.crit.H0,col=’red’,lty=3)
points(pch=19,c(obs.z,obs.z),c(Density.Obs.H0,Density.Obs.H1))
res = paste0(‘BF(H1/H0): ‘,format(round(BF.obs.es,3),nsmall=3))
text(min(z),ymax*.95,pos=4,res)
res = paste0(‘BF(H0/H1): ‘,format(round(1/BF.obs.es,3),nsmall=3))
text(min(z),ymax*.90,pos=4,res)
res = paste0(‘H1 Error Rate: ‘,format(round(H1.error,3),nsmall=3))
text(min(z),ymax*.80,pos=4,res)
res = paste0(‘H0 Error Rate: ‘,format(round(H0.error,3),nsmall=3))
text(min(z),ymax*.75,pos=4,res)

######################################################
### END OF Subjective Bayesian T-Test CODE
######################################################
### Thank you to Jeff Rouder for posting his code that got me started.
### http://jeffrouder.blogspot.ca/2016/01/what-priors-should-i-use-part-i.html

 

Replicability Report No. 1: Is Ego-Depletion a Replicable Effect?

Abstract

It has been a common practice in social psychology to publish only significant results.  As a result, success rates in the published literature do not provide empirical evidence for the existence of a phenomenon.  A recent meta-analysis suggested that ego-depletion is a much weaker effect than the published literature suggests and a registered replication study failed to find any evidence for it.  This article presents the results of a replicability analysis of the ego-depletion literature.  Out of 165 articles with 429 studies (total N  = 33,927),  128 (78%) showed evidence of bias and low replicability (Replicability-Index < 50%).  Closer inspection of the top 10 articles with the strongest evidence against the null-hypothesis revealed some questionable statistical analyses, and only a few articles presented replicable results.  The results of this meta-analysis show that most published findings are not replicable and that the existing literature provides no credible evidence for ego-depletion.  The discussion focuses on the need for a change in research practices and suggests a new direction for research on ego-depletion that can produce conclusive results.

INTRODUCTION

In 1998, Roy F. Baumeister and colleagues published a groundbreaking article titled “Ego Depletion: Is the Active Self a Limited Resource?”   The article stimulated research on the newly minted construct of ego-depletion.  At present, more than 150 articles and over 400 studies with more than 30,000 participants have contributed to the literature on ego-depletion.  In 2010, a meta-analysis of nearly 100 articles, 200 studies, and 10,000 participants concluded that ego-depletion is a real phenomenon with a moderate to strong effect size of six tenth of a standard deviation (Hagger et al., 2010).

In 2011, Roy F. Baumeister and John Tierney published a popular book on ego-depletion titled “Will-Power,” and Roy F. Baumeister became to be known as the leading expert on self-regulation, will-power (The Atlantic, 2012).

Everything looked as if ego-depletion research has a bright future, but five years later the future of ego-depletion research looks gloomy and even prominent ego-depletion researchers wonder whether ego-depletion even exists (Slate, “Everything is Crumbling”, 2016).

An influential psychological theory, borne out in hundreds of experiments, may have just been debunked. How can so many scientists have been so wrong?

What Happened?

It has been known for 60 years that scientific journals tend to publish only successful studies (Sterling, 1959).  That is, when Roy F. Baumeister reported his first ego-depletion study and found that resisting the temptation to eat chocolate cookies led to a decrease in persistence on a difficult task by 17 minutes, the results were published as a groundbreaking discovery.  However, when studies do not produce the predicted outcome, they are not published.  This bias is known as publication bias.  Every researcher knows about publication bias, but the practice is so widespread that it is not considered a serious problem.  Surely, researches would not conduct more failed studies than successful studies and only report the successful ones.  Yes, omitting a few studies with weaker effects leads to an inflation of the effect size, but the successful studies still show the general trend.

The publication of one controversial article in the same journal that published the first ego-depletion article challenged this indifferent attitude towards publication bias. In a shocking article, Bem (2011) presented 9 successful studies demonstrating that extraverted students at Cornell University were seemingly able to foresee random events in the future. In Study 1, they seemed to be able to predict where a computer would present an erotic picture even before the computer randomly determined the location of the picture.  Although the article presented 9 successful studies and 1 marginally successful study, researchers were not convinced that extrasensory perception is a real phenomenon.  Rather, they wondered how credible the evidence in other article is if it is possible to get 9 significant results for a phenomenon that few researchers believed to be real.  As Sterling (1959) pointed out, a 100% success rate does not provide evidence for a phenomenon if only successful studies are reported. In this case, the success rate is by definition 100% no matter whether an effect is real or not.

In the same year, Simmons et al. (2011) showed how researchers can increase the chances to get significant results without a real effect by using a number of statistical practices that seem harmless, but in combination can increase the chance of a false discovery by more than 1000% (from 5% to 60%).  The use of these questionable research practices has been compared to the use of doping in sports (John et al., 2012).  Researchers who use QRPs are able to produce many successful studies, but the results of these studies cannot be replicated when other researchers replicate the reported studies without QRPs.  Skeptics wondered whether many discoveries in psychology are as incredible as Bem’s discovery of extrasensory perception; groundbreaking, spectacular, and false.  Is ego-depletion a real effect or is it an artificial product of publication bias and questionable research practices?

Does Ego-Depletion Depend on Blood Glucose?

The core assumption of ego-depletion theory is that working on an effortful task requires energy and that performance decreases as energy levels decrease.  If this theory is correct, it should be possible to find a physiological correlate of this energy.  Ten years after the inception of ego-depletion theory, Baumeister and colleagues claimed to have found the biological basis of ego-depletion in an article called “Self-control relies on glucose as a limited energy source.”  (Gailliot et al., 2007).  The article had a huge impact on ego-depletion researchers and it became a common practice to measure blood-glucose levels.

Unfortunately, Baumeister and colleagues had not consulted with physiological psychologists when they developed the idea that brain processes depend on blood-glucose levels.  To maintain vital functions, the human body ensures that the brain is relatively independent of peripheral processes.  A large literature in physiological psychology suggested that inhibiting the impulse to eat delicious chocolate cookies would not lead to a measurable drop in blood glucose levels (Kurzban, 2011).

Let’s look at the numbers. A well-known statistic is that the brain, while only 2% of body weight, consumes 20% of the body’s energy. That sounds like the brain consumes a lot of calories, but if we assume a 2,400 calorie/day diet – only to make the division really easy – that’s 100 calories per hour on average, 20 of which, then, are being used by the brain. Every three minutes, then, the brain – which includes memory systems, the visual system, working memory, then emotion systems, and so on – consumes one (1) calorie. One. Yes, the brain is a greedy organ, but it’s important to keep its greediness in perspective.

But, maybe experts on physiology were just wrong and Baumeister and colleagues made another groundbreaking discovery.  After all, they presented 9 successful studies that appeared to support the glucose theory of will-power, but 9 successful studies alone provide no evidence because it is not clear how these successful studies were produced.

To answer this question, Schimmack (2012) developed a statistical test that provides information about the credibility of a set of successful studies. Experimental researchers try to hold many factors that can influence the results constant (all studies are done in the same laboratory, glucose is measured the same way, etc.).  However, there are always factors that the experimenter cannot control. These random factors make it difficult to predict the exact outcome of a study even if everything goes well and the theory is right.  To minimize the influence of these random factors, researchers need large samples, but social psychologists often use small samples where random factors can have a large influence on results.  As a result, conducting a study is a gamble and some studies will fail even if the theory is correct.  Moreover, the probability of failure increases with the number of attempts.  You may get away with playing Russian roulette once, but you cannot play forever.  Thus, eventually failed studies are expected and a 100% success rate is a sign that failed studies were simply not reported.  Schimmack (2012) was able to use the reported statistics in Gailliot et al. (2007) to demonstrate that it was very likely that the 100% success rate was only achieved by hiding failed studies or with the help of questionable research practices.

Baumeister was a reviewer of Schimmack’s manuscript and confirmed the finding that a success rate of 9 out of 9 studies was not credible.

 “My paper with Gailliot et al. (2007) is used as an illustration here. Of course, I am quite familiar with the process and history of that one. We initially submitted it with more studies, some of which had weaker results. The editor said to delete those. He wanted the paper shorter so as not to use up a lot of journal space with mediocre results. It worked: the resulting paper is shorter and stronger. Does that count as magic? The studies deleted at the editor’s request are not the only story. I am pretty sure there were other studies that did not work. Let us suppose that our hypotheses were correct and that our research was impeccable. Then several of our studies would have failed, simply given the realities of low power and random fluctuations. Is anyone surprised that those studies were not included in the draft we submitted for publication? If we had included them, certainly the editor and reviewers would have criticized them and formed a more negative impression of the paper. Let us suppose that they still thought the work deserved publication (after all, as I said, we are assuming here that the research was impeccable and the hypotheses correct). Do you think the editor would have wanted to include those studies in the published version?”

To summarize, Baumeister defends the practice of hiding failed studies with the argument that this practice is acceptable if the theory is correct.  But we do not know whether the theory is correct without looking at unbiased evidence.  Thus, his line of reasoning does not justify the practice of selectively reporting successful results, which provides biased evidence for the theory.  If we could know whether a theory is correct without data, we would not need empirical tests of the theory.  In conclusion, Baumeister’s response shows a fundamental misunderstanding of the role of empirical data in science.  Empirical results are not mere illustrations of what could happen if a theory were correct. Empirical data are supposed to provide objective evidence that a theory needs to explain.

Since my article has been published, there have been several failures to replicate Gailliot et al.’s findings and recent theoretical articles on ego-depletion no longer assume that blood-glucose as the source of ego-depletion.

“Upon closer inspection notable limitations have emerged. Chief among these is the failure to replicate evidence that cognitive exertion actually lowers blood glucose levels.” (Inzlicht, Schmeichel, & Macrae, 2014, p 18).

Thus, the 9 successful studies that were selected by Baumeister et al. (1998) did not illustrate an empirical fact, they created false evidence for a physiological correlate of ego-depletion that could not be replicated.  Precious research resources were wasted on a line of research that could have been avoided by consulting with experts on human physiology and by honestly examining the successful and failed studies that led to the Baumeister et al. (1998) article.

Even Baumeister agrees that the original evidence was false and that glucose is not the biological correlate of ego-depletion.

In retrospect, even the initial evidence might have gotten a boost in significance from a fortuitous control condition. Hence at present it seems unlikely that ego depletion’s effects are caused by a shortage of glucose in the bloodstream” (Baumeister, 2014, p 315).

Baumeister fails to mention that the initial evidence also got a boost from selection bias.

In sum, the glucose theory of ego-depletion was based on selective reporting of studies that provided misleading support for the theory and the theory lacks credible empirical support.  The failure of the glucose theory raises questions about the basic ego-depletion effect.  If researchers in this field used selective reporting and questionable research practices, the evidence for the basic effect is also likely to be biased and the effect may be difficult to replicate.

If 200 studies show ego-depletion effects, it must be real?

Psychologists have not ignored publication bias altogether.  The main solution to the problem is to conduct meta-analyses.  A meta-analysis combines information from several small studies to examine whether an effect is real.  The problem for meta-analysis is that publication bias also influences the results of a meta-analysis.  If only successful studies are published, a meta-analysis of published studies will show evidence for an effect no matter whether the effect actually exists or not.  For example, the top journal for meta-analysis, Psychological Bulletin, has published meta-analyses that provide evidence for extransensory perception (Bem & Honorton, 1994).

To address this problem, meta-analysts have developed a number of statistical tools to detect publication bias.  The most prominent method is Eggert’s regression of effect size estimates on sampling error.  A positive correlation can reveal publication bias because studies with larger sampling errors (small samples) require larger effect sizes to achieve statistical significance.  To produce these large effect sizes when the actual effect does not exist or is smaller, researchers need to hide more studies or use more questionable research practices.  As a result, these results are particularly difficult to replicate.

Although the use of these statistical methods is state of the art, the original ego-depletion meta-analysis that showed moderate to large effects did not examine the presence of publication bias (Hagger et al., 2010). This omission was corrected in a meta-analysis by Carter and McCollough (2014).

Upon reading Hagger et al. (2010), we realized that their efforts to estimate and account for the possible influence of publication bias and other small-study effects had been less than ideal, given the methods available at the time of its publication (Carter & McCollough, 2014).

The authors then used Eggert regression to examine publication bias.  Moreover, they used a new method that was not available at the time of Hagger et al.’s (2010) meta-analysis to estimate the effect size of ego-depletion after correcting for the inflation caused by publication bias.

Not surprisingly, the regression analysis showed clear evidence of publication bias.  More stunning were the results of the effect size estimate after correcting for publication bias.  The bias-corrected effect size estimate was d = .25 with a 95% confidence interval ranging from d = .18 to d = .32.   Thus, even the upper limit of the confidence interval is about 50% less than the effect size estimate in the original meta-analysis without correction for publication bias.   This suggests that publication bias inflated the effect size estimate by 100% or more.  Interestingly, a similar result was obtained in the reproducibility project, where a team of psychologists replicated 100 original studies and found that published effect sizes were over 100% larger than effect sizes in the replication project (OSC, 2015).

An effect size of d = .2 is considered small.  This does not mean that the effect has no practical importance, but it raises questions about the replicability of ego-depletion results.  To obtain replicable results, researchers should plan studies so that they have an 80% chance to get significant results despite the unpredictable influence of random error.  For small effects, this implies that studies require large samples.  For the standard ego-depletion paradigm with an experimental group and a control group and an effect size of d = .2, a sample size of 788 participants is needed to achieve 80% power. However, the largest sample size in an ego-depletion study was only 501 participants.  A sample size of 388 participants is needed to achieve significance without an inflated effect size (50% power) and most studies fall short of this requirement in sample size.  Thus, most published ego-depletion results are unlikely to replicate and future ego-depletion studies are likely to produce non-significant results.

In conclusion, even 100 studies with 100% successful results do not provide convincing evidence that ego-depletion exists and which experimental procedures can be used to replicate the basic effect.

Replicability without Publication Bias

In response to concerns about replicability, the American Psychological Society created a new format for publications.  A team of researchers can propose a replication project.  The research proposal is peer-reviewed like a grant application.  When the project is approved, researchers conduct the studies and publish the results independent of the outcome of the project.  If it is successful, the results confirm that earlier findings that were reported with publication bias are replicable, although probably with a smaller effect size.  If the studies fail, the results suggest that the effect may not exist or that the effect size is very small.

In the fall of 2014 Hagger and Chatzisarantis announced a replication project of an ego-depletion study.

The third RRR will do so using the paradigm developed and published by Sripada, Kessler, and Jonides (2014), which is similar to that used in the original depletion experiments (Baumeister et al., 1998; Muraven et al., 1998), using only computerized versions of tasks to minimize variability across laboratories. By using preregistered replications across multiple laboratories, this RRR will allow for a precise, objective estimate of the size of the ego depletion effect.

In the end, 23 laboratories participated and the combined sample size of all studies was N = 2141.  This sample size affords an 80% probability to obtain a significant result (p < .05, two-tailed) with an effect size of d = .12, which is below the lower limit of the confidence interval of the bias-corrected meta-analysis.  Nevertheless, the study failed to produce a statistically significant result, d = .04 with a 95%CI ranging from d = -.07 to d = .14.  Thus, the results are inconsistent with a small effect size of d = .20 and suggest that ego-depletion may not even exist at all.

Ego-depletion researchers have responded to this result differently.  Michael Inzlicht, winner of a theoretical innovation prize for his work on ego-depletion, wrote:

The results of a massive replication effort, involving 24 labs (or 23, depending on how you count) and over 2,000 participants, indicates that short bouts of effortful control had no discernable effects on low-level inhibitory control. This seems to contradict two decades of research on the concept of ego depletion and the resource model of self-control. Like I said: science is brutal.

In contrast, Roy F. Baumeister questioned the outcome of this research project that provided the most comprehensive and scientific test of ego-depletion.  In a response with co-author Kathleen D. Vohs titled “A misguided effort with elusive implications,” Baumeister tries to explain why ego depletion is a real effect, despite the lack of unbiased evidence for it.

The first line of defense is to question the validity of the paradigm that was used for the replication project. The only problem is that this paradigm seemed reasonable to the editors who approved the project, researchers who participated in the project and who expected a positive result, and to Baumeister himself when he was consulted during the planning of the replication project.  In his response, Baumeister reverses his opinion about the paradigm.

In retrospect, the decision to use new, mostly untested procedures for a large replication project was foolish.

He further claims that he proposed several well-tested procedures, but that these procedures were rejected by the replication team for technical reasons.

Baumeister nominated several procedures that have been used in successful studies of ego depletion for years. But none of Baumeister’s suggestions were allowable due to the RRR restrictions that it must be done with only computerized tasks that were culturally and linguistically neutral.

Baumeister and Vohs then claim that the manipulation did not lead to ego-depletion and that it is not surprising that an unsuccessful manipulation does not produce an effect.

Signs indicate the RRR was plagued by manipulation failure — and therefore did not test ego depletion.

They then assure readers that ego-depletion is real because they have demonstrated the effect repeatedly using various experimental tasks.

For two decades we have conducted studies of ego depletion carefully and honestly, following the field’s best practices, and we find the effect over and over (as have many others in fields as far-ranging as finance to health to sports, both in the lab and large-scale field studies). There is too much evidence to dismiss based on the RRR, which after all is ultimately a single study — especially if the manipulation failed to create ego depletion.

This last statement is, however, misleading if not outright deceptive.  As noted earlier, Baumeister admitted to the practice of not publishing disconfirming evidence.  He and I disagree whether the selective publication of successful studies is honest or dishonest.  He wrote:

 “We did run multiple studies, some of which did not work, and some of which worked better than others. You may think that not reporting the less successful studies is wrong, but that is how the field works.” (Roy Baumeister, personal email communication)

So, when Baumeister and Vohs assure readers that they conducted ego-depletion research carefully and honestly, they are not saying that they reported all studies that they conducted in their labs.  The successful studies published in articles are not representative of the studies conducted in their labs.

In a response to Baumeister and Vohs, the lead authors of the replication project pointed out that ego-depletion does not exist unless proponents of ego-depletion theory can specify experimental procedures that reliably produce the predicted effect.

The onus is on researchers to develop a clear set of paradigms that reliably evoke depletion in large samples with high power (Hagger & Chatzisarantis, 2016)

In an open email letter, I asked Baumeister and Vohs to name paradigms that could replicate a published ego-depletion effect.  They were not able or willing to name a single paradigm. Roy Bameister’s response was “In view of your reputation as untrustworthy, dishonest, and otherwise obnoxious, i prefer not to cooperate or collaborate with you.” 

I did not request to collaborate with him.  I merely asked which paradigm would be able to produce ego-depletion effects in an open and transparent replication study, given his criticism of the most rigorous replication study that he initially approved.

If an expert who invented a theory and published numerous successful studies cannot name a paradigm that will work, it suggests that he does not know which studies may work because for each published successful study there are unpublished, unsuccessful studies that used the same procedure, and it is not obvious which study would actually replicate in an honest and transparent replication project.

A New Meta-Analysis of Ego-Depletion Studies:  Are there replicable effects?

Since I published the incredibility index (Schimmack, 2012) and demonstrated bias in research on glucose and ego-depletion, I have developed new and more powerful ways to reveal selection bias and questionable research practices.  I applied these methods to the large literature on ego-depletion to examine whether there are some credible ego-depletion effects and a paradigm that produces replicable effects.

The first method uses powergraphs (Schimmack, 2015) to examine selection bias and the replicability of a set of studies. To create a powergrpah, original research results are converted into absolute z-score.  A z-score shows how much evidence a study result provides against the null-hypothesis that there is no effect.  Unlike effect size measures, z-scores also contain information about the sample size (sampling error).   I therefore distinguish between meta-analysis of effect sizes and meta-analysis of evidence.  Effect size meta-analysis aims to determine the typical, average size of an effect.  Meta-analyses of evidence examine how strong the evidence for an effect (i.e., against the null-hypothesis of no effect) is.

The distribution of absolute z-scores provides important information about selection bias, questionable research practices, and replicability.  Selection bias is revealed if the distribution of z-scores shows a steep drop on the left side of the criterion for statistical significance (this is analogous to the empty space below the line for significance in a funnel plot). Questionable research practices are revealed if z-scores cluster in the area just above the significance criterion.  Replicabilty is estimated by fitting a weighted composite of several non-central distributions that simulate studies with different non-centrality parameters and sampling error.

A literature search retrieved 165 articles that reported 429 studies.  For each study, the most important statistical test was converted first into a two-tailed p-value and then into a z-score.  A single test statistic was used to ensure that all z-scores are statistically independent.

Powergraph for Ego Depletion (Focal Tests)

 

The results show clear evidence of selection bias (Figure 1).  Although there are some results below the significance criterion (z = 1.96, p < .05, two-tailed), most of these results are above z = 1.65, which corresponds to p < .10 (two-tailed) or p < .05 (one-tailed).  These results are typically reported as marginally significant and used as evidence for an effect.   There are hardly any results that fail to confirm a prediction based on ego-depletion theory.  Using z = 1.65 as criterion, the success rate is 96%, which is common for the reported success rate in psychological journals (Sterling, 1959; Sterling et al., 1995; OSC, 2015).  The steep cliff in the powergraph shows that this success rate is due to selection bias because random error would have produced a more gradual decline with many more non-significant results.

The next observation is the tall bar just above the significance criterion with z-scores between 2 and 2.2.   This result is most likely due to questionable research practices that lead to just significant results such as optional stopping or selective dropping of outliers.

Another steep drop is observed at z-scores of 2.6.  This drop is likely due to the use of further questionable research practices such as dropping of experimental conditions, use of multiple dependent variables, or simply running multiple studies and selecting only significant results.

A rather large proportion of z-scores are in the questionable range from z = 1.96 to 2.60.  These results are unlikely to replicate. Although some studies may have reported honest results, there are too many questionable results and it is impossible to say which results are trustworthy and which results are not.  It is like getting information from a group of people where 60% are liars and 40% tell the truth.  Even though 40% are telling the truth, the information is useless without knowing who is telling the truth and who is lying.

The best bet to find replicable ego-depletion results is to focus on the largest z-scores as replicability increases with the strength of evidence (OSC, 2015). The power estimation method uses the distribution of z-scores greater than 2.6 to estimate the average power of these studies.  The estimated power is 47% with a 95% confidence interval ranging from 32% to 63%.  This result suggests that some ego-depletion studies have produced replicable results.  In the next section, I examine which studies this may be.

In sum, a state-of-the art meta-analysis of evidence for an effect in the ego-depletion literature shows clear evidence for selection bias and the use of questionable research practices.  Many published results are essentially useless because the evidence is not credible.  However, the results also show that some studies produced replicable effects, which is consistent with Carter and McCollough’s finding that the average effect size is likely to be above zero.

What Ego-Depletion Studies Are Most Likely to Replicate?

Powergraphs are useful for large sets of heterogeneous studies.  However, they are not useful to examine the replicability of a single study or small sets of studies, such as a set of studies in a multiple-study article.  For this purpose, I developed two additional tools that detect bias in published results. .

The Test of Insufficient Variance (TIVA) requires a minimum of two independent studies.  As z-scores follow a normal distribution (the normal distribution of random error), the variance of z-scores should be 1.  However, if non-significant results are omitted from reported results, the variance shrinks.  TIVA uses the standard comparison of variances to compute the probability that an observed variance of z-scores is an unbiased sample drawn from a normal distribution.  TIVA has been shown to reveal selection bias in Bem’s (2011) article and it is a more powerful test than the incredibility index (Schimmack, 2012).

The R-Index is based on the Incredibilty Index in that it compares the success rate (percentage of significant results) with the observed statistical power of a test. However, the R-Index does not test the probability of the success rate.  Rather, it uses the observed power to predict replicability of an exact replication study.  The R-Index has two components. The first component is the median observed power of a set of studies.  In the limit, median observed power approaches the average power of an unbiased set of exact replication studies.  However, when selection bias is present, median observed power is biased and provides an inflated estimate of true power.  The R-Index measures the extent of selection bias by means of the difference between success rate and median observed power.  If median observed power is 75% and the success rate is 100%, the inflation rate is 25% (100 – 75 = 25).  The inflation rate is subtracted from median observed power to correct for the inflation.  The resulting replication index is not directly an estimate of power, except for the special case when power is 50% and the success rate is 100%   When power is 50% and the success rate is 100%, median observed power increases to 75%.  In this case, the inflation correction of 25% returns the actual power of 50%.

I emphasize this special case because 50% power is also a critical point at which point a rational bet would change from betting against replication (Replicability < 50%) to betting on a successful replication (Replicability > 50%).  Thus, an R-Index of 50% suggests that a study or a set of studies produced a replicable result.  With success rates close to 100%, this criterion implies that median observed power is 75%, which corresponds to a z-score of 2.63.  Incidentally, a z-score of 2.6 also separated questionable results from more credible results in the powergraph analysis above.

It may seem problematic to use the R-Index even for a single study because observed power of a single study is strongly influenced by random factors and observed power is by definition above 50% for a significant result. However, The R-Index provides a correction for selection bias and a significant result implies a 100% success rate.  Of course, it could also be an honestly reported result, but if the study was published in a field with evidence of selection bias, the R-Index provides a reasonable correction for publication bias.  To achieve an R-Index above 50%, observed power has to be greater than 75%.

This criterion has been validated with social psychology studies in the reproducibilty project, where the R-Index predicted replication success with over 90% accuracy. This criterion also correctly predicted that the ego-depletion replication project would produce fewer than 50% successful replications, which it did, because the R-Index for the original study was way below 50% (F(1,90) = 4.64, p = .034, z = 2.12, OP = .56, R-Index = .12).  If this information had been available during the planning of the RRR, researchers might have opted for a paradigm with a higher chance of a successful replication.

To identify paradigms with higher replicability, I computed the R-Index and TIVA (for articles with more than one study) for all 165 articles in the meta-analysis.  For TIVA I used p < .10 as criterion for bias and for the R-Index I used .50 as the criterion.   37 articles (22%) passed this test.  This implies that 128 (78%) showed signs of statistical bias and/or low replicability.  Below I discuss the Top 10 articles with the highest R-Index to identify paradigms that may produce a reliable ego-depletion effect.

1. Robert D. Dvorak and Jeffrey S. Simons (PSPB, 2009) [ID = 142, R-Index > .99]

This article reported a single study with an unusually large sample size for ego-depletion studies. 180 participants were randomly assigned to a standard ego-depletion manipulation. In the control condition, participants watched an amusing video.  In the depletion condition, participants watched the same video, but they were instructed to suppress all feelings and expressions.  The dependent variable was persistence on a set of solvable and unsolvable anagrams.  The t-value in this study suggests strong evidence for an ego-depletion effect, t(178) = 5.91.  The large sample size contributes to this, but the effect size is also large, d = .88.

Interestingly, this study is an exact replication of Study 3 in the seminal ego-depletion article by Baumeister et al. (1998), which obtained a significant effect with just 30 participants and a strong effect size of d = .77, t(28) = 2.12.

The same effect was also reported in a study with 132 smokers (Heckman, Ditre, & Brandon, 2012). Smokers who were not allowed to smoke persisted longer on a figure tracing task when they could watch an emotional video normally than when they had to suppress emotional responses, t(64) = 3.15, d = .78.  The depletion effect was weaker when smokers were allowed to smoke between the video and the figure tracing task. The interaction effect was significant, F(1, 128) = 7.18.

In sum, a set of studies suggests that emotion suppression influences persistence on a subsequent task.  The existing evidence suggests that this is a rather strong effect that can be replicated across laboratories.

2. Megan Oaten, Kipling D. William, Andrew Jones, & Lisa Zadro (J Soc Clinical Psy, 2008) [ID = 118, R-Index > .99]

This article reports two studies that manipulated social exclusion (ostracism) under the assumption that social exclusion is ego-depleting. The dependent variable was consumption of an unhealthy food in Study 1 and drinking a healthy, but unpleasant drink in Study 2.  Both studies showed extremely strong effects of ego-depletion (Study 1: d = 2.69, t(71) = 11.48;  Study 2: d = 1.48, t(72) = 6.37.

One concern about these unusually strong effects is the transformation of the dependent variable.  The authors report that they first ranked the data and then assigned z-scores corresponding to the estimated cumulative proportion.  This is an unusual procedure and it is difficult to say whether this procedure inadvertently inflated the effect size of ego-depletion.

Interestingly, one other article used social exclusion as an ego-depletion manipulation (Baumeister et al., 2005).  This article reported six studies and TIVA showed evidence of selection bias, Var(z) = 0.15, p = .02.  Thus, the reported effect sizes in this article are likely to be inflated.  The first two studies used consumption of an unpleasant tasting drink and eating cookies, respectively, as dependent variables. The reported effect sizes were weaker than in the article by Oaten et al. (d = 1.00, d = .90).

In conclusion, there is some evidence that participants avoid displeasure and seek pleasure after social rejection. A replication study with a sufficient sample size may replicate this result with a weaker effect size.  However, even if this effect exists it is not clear that the effect is mediated by ego-depletion.

3. Kathleen D. Vohs & Ronald J. Farber (Journal of Consumer Research) [ID = 29, R-Index > .99]

This article examined the effect of several ego-depletion manipulations on purchasing behavior.  Study 1 found a weaker effect, t(33) = 2.83,  than Studies 2 and 3, t(63) = 5.26, t(33) = 5.52, respectively.  One possible explanation is that the latter studies used actual purchasing behavior.  Study 2 used the White Bear paradigm and Study 2 used amplification of emotion expressions as ego-depletion manipulations.  Although statistically robust, purchasing behavior does not seem to be the best indicator of ego-depletion.  Thus, replication efforts may focus on other dependent variables that measure ego-depletion more directly.

4. Kathleen D. Vohs, Roy F. Baumeister, & Brandon J. Schmeichel (JESP, 2012/2013) [ID = 49, R-Index = .96]

This article was first published in 2012, but the results for Study 1 were misreported and a corrected version was published in 2013.  The article presents two studies with a 2 x 3 between-subject design. Study 1 had n = 13 participants per cell and Study 2 had n = 35 participants per cell.  Both studies showed an interaction between ego-depletion manipulations and manipulations of self-control beliefs. The dependent variables in both studies were the Cognitive Estimation Test and a delay of gratification task.  Results were similar for both dependent measures. I focus on the CET because it provides a more direct test of ego-depletion; that is, the draining of resources.

In the condition with limited-will-power beliefs of Study 1, the standard ego-depletion effect that compares depleted participants to a control condition was a decreased by about 6 points from about 30 to 24 points (no exact means or standard deviations, or t-values for this contrast are provided).  The unlimited will-power condition shows a smaller decrease by 2 points (31 vs. 29).  Study 2 replicates this pattern. In the limited-will-power condition, CET scores decreased again by 6 points from 32 to 26 and in the unlimited-will-power condition CET scores decreased by about 2 points from about 31 to 29 points.  This interaction effect would again suggest that the standard depletion effect can be reduced by manipulating participants’ beliefs.

One interesting aspect of the study was the demonstration that ego-depletion effects increase with the number of ego-depleting tasks.  Performance on the CET decreased further when participants completed 4 vs. 2 or 3 vs. 1 depleting task.  Thus, given the uncertainty about the existence of ego-depletion, it would make sense to start with a strong manipulation that compares a control condition with a condition with multiple ego-depleting tasks.

One concern about this article is the use of the CET as a measure of ego-depletion.  The task was used in only one other study by Schmeichel, Vohs, and Baumeister (2003) with a small sample of N = 37 participants.  The authors reported a just significant effect on the CET, t(35) = 2.18.  However, Vohs et al. (2013) increased the number of items from 8 to 20, which makes the measure more reliable and sensitive to experimental manipulations.

Another limitation of this study is that there was no control condition without manipulation of beliefs. It is possible that the depletion effect in this study was amplified by the limited-will-power manipulation. Thus, a simple replication of this study would not provide clear evidence for ego-depletion.  However, it would be interesting to do a replication study that examines the effect of ego-depletion on the CET without manipulation of beliefs.

In sum, this study could provide the basis for a successful demonstration of ego-depletion by comparing effects on the CET for a control condition versus a condition with multiple ego-depletion tasks.

5. Veronika Job, Carol S. Dweck, and Gregory M. Walton (Psy Science, 2010) [ID = 191, R-Index = 94]

The article by Job et al. (2010) is noteworthy for several reasons.  First, the article presented three close replications of the same effect with high t-values, ts = 3.88, 8.47, 2.62.  Based on these results, one would expect that other researchers can replicate the results.  Second, the effect is an interaction between a depletion manipulation and a subtle manipulation of theories about the effect of working on an effortful task.  Hidden among other questionnaires, participants received either items that suggested depletion (“After a strenuous mental activity your energy is depleted and you must rest to get it refueled again” or items that suggested energy is unlimited (“Your mental stamina fuels itself; even after strenuous mental exertion you can continue doing more of it”). The pattern of the interaction effect showed that only participants who received the depletion items showed the depletion effect.  Participants who received the unlimited energy items showed no significant difference in Stroop performance.  Taken at face value, this finding would challenge depletion theory, which assumes that depletion is an involuntary response to exerting effort.

However, the study also raises questions because the authors used an unconventional statistical method to analyze their data.  Data were analyzed with a multi-level model that modeled errors as a function of factors that vary within participants over time and factors that vary between participants, including the experimental manipulations.  In an email exchange, the lead author confirmed that the model did not include random factors for between-subject variance.  A statistician assured the lead author that this was acceptable.  However, a simple computation of the standard deviation around mean accuracy levels would show that this variance is not zero.  Thus, the model artificially inflated the evidence for an effect by treating between-subject variance as within-subject variance. In a betwee-subject analysis, the small differences in error rates (about 5 percentage points) are unlikely to be significant.

In sum, it is doubtful that a replication study would replicate the interaction between depletion manipulations and the implicit theory manipulation reported in Job et al. (2010) in an appropriate between-subject analysis.  Even if this result would replicate, it would not support the theory that ego-depletion is a limited resource that is depleted after a short effortful task because the effect can be undone with a simple manipulations of beliefs in unlimited energy.

6. Roland Imhoff, Alexander F. Schmidt, & Friederike Gerstenberg (Journal of Personality, 2014) [ID = 146, R-Index = .90]

Study 1 reports results a standard ego-depletion paradigm with a relatively larger sample (N = 123).  The ego-depletion manipulation was a Stroop task with 180 trials.  The dependent variable was consumption of chocolates (M&M).  The study reported a large effect, d = .72, and strong evidence for an ego-depletion effect, t(127) = 4.07.  The strong evidence is in part justified by the large sample size, but the standardized effect size seems a bit large for a difference of 2g in consumption, whereas the standard deviation of consumption appears a bit small (3g).  A similar study with M&M consumption as dependent variable found a 2g difference in the opposite direction with a much larger standard deviation of 16g and no significant effect, t(48) = -0.44.

The second study produced results in line with other ego-depletion studies and did not contribute to the high R-Index of the article, t(101) = 2.59. The third study was a correlational study with examined correlates of a trait measure of ego-depletion.  Even if this correlation is replicable, it does not support the fundamental assumption of ego-depletion theory of situational effects of effort on subsequent effort.  In sum, it is unlikely that Study 1 is replicable and that strong results are due to misreported standard deviations.

7. Hugo J.E.M. Alberts, Carolien Martijn, & Nanne K. de Vries (JESP, 2011) [ID = 56, R-Index = .86]

This article reports the results of a single study that crossed an ego-depletion manipulation with a self-awareness priming manipulation (2 x 2 with n = 20 per cell).  The dependent variable was persistence in a hand-grip task.  Like many other handgrip studies, this study assessed handgrip persistence before and after the manipulation, which increases the statistical power to detect depletion effects.

The study found weak evidence for an ego-depletion effect, but relatively strong evidence for an interaction effect, F(1,71) = 13.00.  The conditions without priming showed a weak ego depletion effect (6s difference, d = .25).  The strong interaction effect was due to the priming conditions, where depleted participants showed an increase in persistence by 10s and participants in the control condition showed a decrease in performance by 15s.  Even if this is a replicable finding, it does not support the ego-depletion effect.  The weak evidence for ego depletion with the handgrip task is consistent with a meta-analysis of handgrip studies (Schimmack, 2015).

In short, although this study produced an R-Index above .50, closer inspection of the results shows no strong evidence for ego-depletion.

8. James M. Tyler (Human Communications Research, 2008) [ID = 131, R-Index = .82]

This article reports three studies that show depletion effects after sharing intimate information with strangers.  In the depletion condition, participants were asked to answer 10 private questions in a staged video session that suggested several other people were listening.  This manipulation had strong effects on persistence in an anagram task (Study 1, d = 1.6, F(2,45) = 16.73) and the hand-grip task (Study 2: d = 1.35, F(2,40) = 11.09). Study 3 reversed tasks and showed that the crossing-E task influenced identification of complex non-verbal cues, but not simple non-verbal cues, F(1,24) = 13.44. The effect of the depletion manipulation on complex cues was very large, d = 1.93.  Study 4 crossed the social manipulation of depletion from Studies 1 and 2 with the White Bear suppression manipulation and used identification of non-verbal cues as the dependent variable.  The study showed strong evidence for an interaction effect, F(1,52) = 19.41.  The pattern of this interaction is surprising, because the White Bear suppression task showed no significant effect after not sharing intimate details, t(28) = 1.27, d = .46.  In contrast, the crossing-E task had produced a very strong effect in Study 3, d = 1.93.  The interaction was driven by a strong effect of the White Bear manipulation after sharing intimate details, t(28) = 4.62, d = 1.69.

Even though the statistical results suggest that these results are highly replicable, the small sample sizes and very large effect sizes raise some concerns about replicability.  The large effects cannot be attributed to the ego-depletion tasks or measures that have been used in many other studies that produced much weaker effect. Thus, the only theoretical explanation for these large effect sizes would be that ego depletion has particularly strong effects on social processes.  Even if these effects could be replicated, it is not clear that ego-depletion is the mediating mechanism.  Especially the complex manipulation in the first two studies allow for multiple causal pathways.  It may also be difficult to recreate this manipulation and a failure to replicate the results could be attribute to problems with reproducibility.  Thus, a replication of this study is unlikely to advance understanding of ego-depletion without first establishing that ego-depletion exists.

9. Brandon J. Schmeichel, Heath A. Demaree, Jennifer L. Robinson, & Jie Pu (Social Cognition, 2006) [ID = 52, R-Index = .80]

This article reported one study with an emotion regulation task. Participants in the depletion condition were instructed to exaggerated emotional responses to a disgusting film clip.  The study used two task to measure ego-depletion.  One task required generation of words; the other task required generation of figures.  The article reports strong evidence in an ANOVA with both dependent variables, F(1,46) = 11.99.  Separate analyses of the means show a stronger effect for the figural task, d = .98, than for the verbal task, d = .50.

The main concern with this study is that the fluency measures were never used in any other study.  If a replication study fails, one could argue that the task is not a valid measure of ego-depletion.  However, the study shows the advantage of using multiple measures to increase statistical power (Schimmack, 2012).

10. Mark Muraven, Marylene Gagne, and Heather Rosman (JESP, 2008) [ID = 15, R-Index = .78]

Study 1 reports the results of a 2 x 2 design with N = 30 participants (~ 7.5 participants per condition).  It crossed an ego-depletion manipulation (resist eating chocolate cookies vs. radishes) with a self-affirmation manipulation.  The dependent variable was the number of errors in a vigilance task (respond to a 4 after a 6).  The results section shows some inconsistencies.  The 2 x 2 ANOVA shows strong evidence for an interaction, F(1,28) = 10.60, but the planned contrast that matches the pattern of means, shows a just significant effect, F(1,28) = 5.18.  Neither of these statistics is consistent with the reported means and standard deviations, where the depleted not affirmed group has twice the number of errors (M = 12.25, SD = 1.63) than the depleted group with affirmation (M = 5.40, SD = 1.34). These results would imply a standardized effect size of d = 4.59.

Study 2 did not manipulate ego-depletion and reported a more reasonable, but also less impressive result for the self-affirmation manipulation, F(2,63) = 4.67.

Study 3 crossed an ego-depletion manipulation with a pressure manipulation.  The ego-depletion task was a computerized ego-depletion task where participants in the depletion condition had to type a paragraph without copying the letter E or spaces. This is more difficult than just copying a paragraph.  The pressure manipulation were constant reminders to avoid making errors and to be as fast as possible.  The sample size was N = 96 (n = 24 per cell).  The dependent variable was the vigilance task from Study 1.  The evidence for a depletion effect was strong, F(1, 92) = 10.72 (z = 3.17).  However, the effect was qualified by the pressure manipulation, F(1,92) = 6.72.  There was a strong depletion effect in the pressure condition, d = .78, t(46) = 2.63, but there was no evidence for a depletion effect in the no-pressure condition, d = -.23, t(46) = 0.78.

The standard deviations in Study 3 that used the same dependent variable were considerable wider than the standard deviations in Study 1, which explains the larger standardized effect sizes in Study 1.  With the standard deviations of Study 3, Study 1 would not have

DISCUSSION AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

The original ego-depletion article published in 1998 has spawned a large literature with over 150 articles, more than 400 studies, and a total number of over 30,000 participants. There have been numerous theoretical articles and meta-analyses of this literature.  Unfortunately, the empirical results reported in this literature are not credible because there is strong evidence that reported results are biased.  The bias makes it difficult to predict which effects are replicable. The main conclusion that can be drawn from this shaky mountain of evidence is that ego-depletion researchers have to change the way they conduct and report their findings.

Importantly, this conclusion is in stark disagreement with Baumeister’s recommendations.  In a forthcoming article, he suggests that “the field has done very well with the methods and standards it has developed over recent decades,” (p. 2), and he proposes that “we should continue with business as usual” (p. 1).

Baumeister then explicitly defends the practice of selectively publishing studies that produced significant results without reporting failures to demonstrate the effect in conceptually similar studies.

Critics of the practice of running a series of small studies seem to think researchers are simply conducting multiple tests of the same hypothesis, and so they argue that it would be better to conduct one large test. Perhaps they have a point: One big study could be arguably better than a series of small ones. But they also miss the crucial point that the series of small studies is typically designed to elaborate the idea in different directions, such as by identifying boundary conditions, mediators, moderators, and extensions. The typical Study 4 is not simply another test of the same hypothesis as in Studies 1–3. Rather, each one is different. And yes, I suspect the published report may leave out a few other studies that failed. Again, though, those studies’ purpose was not primarily to provide yet another test of the same hypothesis. Instead, they sought to test another variation, such as a different manipulation, or a different possible boundary condition, or a different mediator. Indeed, often the idea that motivated Study 1 has changed so much by the time Study 5 is run that it is scarcely recognizable. (p. 2)

Baumeister overlooks that a program of research that tests novel hypothesis with new experimental procedures in small samples is most likely to produce a non-significant result.  When these results are not reported, only reporting significant results does not mean that these studies successfully demonstrated an effect or elucidated moderating factors. The result of this program of research is a complicated pattern of results that is shaped by random error, selection bias, and weak true effects that are difficult to replicate (Figure 1).

Baumeister makes the logical mistake to assume that the type-I error rate is reset when a study is not a direct replication and that the type-I error only increases for exact replications. For example, it is obvious that we should not believe that eating green jelly beans decreases the risk of cancer, if 1 out of 20 studies with green jelly beans produced a significant result.  With a 5% error rate, we would expect one significant result in 20 attempts by chance alone.  Importantly, this does not change if green jelly beans showed an effect, but red, orange, purple, blue, ….. jelly beans did not show an effect.  With each study, the risk of a false positive result increases and if 1 out of 20 studies produced a significant result, the success rate is not higher than one would expect by chance alone.  It is therefore important to report all results and to report only the one green-jelly bean study with a significant result distorts the scientific evidence.

Baumeister overlooks the multiple comparison problem when he claims that “a series of small studies can build and refine a hypothesis much more thoroughly than a single large study”

As the meta-analysis, a series of over 400 small studies with selection bias tells us very little about ego-depletion and it remains unclear under which conditions the effect can be reliably demonstrated.  To his credit, Baumeister is humble enough to acknowledge that his sanguine view of social psychological research is biased.

In my humble and biased view, social psychology has actually done quite well. (p. 2)

Baumeister remembers fondly the days when he learned how to conduct social psychological experiments.  “When I was in graduate school in the 1970s, n=10 was the norm, and people who went to n=20 were suspected of relying on flimsy effects and wasting precious research participants.”  A simple power analysis with these sample sizes shows that a study with n = 10 per cell (N = 20) has a sensitivity to detect effect sizes of d = 1.32 with 80% probability.  Even the biased effect size estimate for ego-depletion studies was only half of this effect size.  Thus, a sample size of n = 10 is ridiculously low.  What about a sample size of n = 20?   It still requires an effect size of d = .91 to have an 80% chance to produce a significant result.  Maybe Roy Baumeister might think that it is sufficient to aim for 50% success rate and to drop the other 50%.  An effect size of d = .64 gives researchers a 50% chance to get a significant result with N = 40.  But the meta-analysis shows that the bias-correct effect size is less than this.  So, even n = 20 is not sufficient to demonstrate ego-depletion effects.  Does this mean the effects are too flimsy to study?

Inadvertently, Baumeister seems to dismiss ego-depletion effects as irrelevant, if it would require large sample sizes to demonstrate ego-depletion.

Large samples increase statistical power. Therefore, if social psychology changes to insist on large samples, many weak effects will be significant that would have failed with the traditional and smaller samples. Some of these will be important effects that only became apparent with larger samples because of the constraints on experiments. Other findings will however make a host of weak effects significant, so more minor and trivial effects will enter into the body of knowledge.

If ego-depletion effects are not really strong, but only inflated by selection bias, and the real effects are much weaker, they may be minor and trivial effects that have little practical significance for the understanding of self-control in real life.

Baumeister then comes to the most controversial claim of his article that has produced a vehement response on social media.  He claims that a special skill called flair is needed to produce significant results with small samples.

Getting a significant result with n = 10 often required having an intuitive flair for how to set up the most conducive situation and produce a highly impactful procedure.

The need for flair also explains why some researchers fail to replicate original studies by researchers with flair.

But in that process, we have created a career niche for bad experimenters. This is an underappreciated fact about the current push for publishing failed replications. I submit that some experimenters are incompetent. In the past their careers would have stalled and failed. But today, a broadly incompetent experimenter can amass a series of impressive publications simply by failing to replicate other work and thereby publishing a series of papers that will achieve little beyond undermining our field’s ability to claim that it has accomplished anything.

Baumeister even noticed individual differences in flair among his graduate and post-doctoral students.  The measure of flair was whether students were able to present significant results to him.

Having mentored several dozen budding researchers as graduate students and postdocs, I have seen ample evidence that people’s ability to achieve success in social psychology varies. My laboratory has been working on self-regulation and ego depletion for a couple decades. Most of my advisees have been able to produce such effects, though not always on the first try. A few of them have not been able to replicate the basic effect after several tries. These failures are not evenly distributed across the group. Rather, some people simply seem to lack whatever skills and talents are needed. Their failures do not mean that the theory is wrong.

The first author of the glucose paper was a victim of a doctoral advisor who believed that one could demonstrate a correlation between blood glucose levels and behavior with samples of 20 or less participants.  He found a way to produce these results in a way that produced statistical evidence of bias, but this effort was wasted on a false theory and a program of research that could not produce evidence for or against the theory because sample sizes were too small to show the effect even if the theory were correct.  Furthermore, it is not clear how many graduate students left Baumeister’s lab thinking that they were failures because they lacked research skills when they only applied the scientific method correctly?

Baumeister does not elaborate further what distinguishes researchers with flair from those without flair.  To better understand flair, I examined the seminal ego-depletion study.  In this study, 67 participants were assigned to three conditions (n = 22 per cell).  The study was advertised as a study on taste perception.  Experimenters baked chocolate cookies in a laboratory room and the room smelled of freshly baked chocolate cookies.  Participants were seated at a table with a bowl of freshly baked cookies and a bowl with red and white radishes.  Participants were instructed to taste either radishes or chocolate cookies.  They were then told that they had to wait at least 15 minutes to allow the sensory memory of the food to fade.  During this time, they were asked to work on an unrelated task.  The task was a figure tracing puzzle with two unsolvable puzzles.  Participants were told that they can take as much time and as many trials as you want and that they will not be judged on the number of trials or the time they take, and that they will be judged on whether or not they finish the task.  However, if they wished to stop without finishing, they could ring a bell to notify the experimenter.  The time spent on this task was used as the dependent variable.  The study showed a strong effect of the manipulation.  Participants who had to taste radishes rang the bell 10 minutes earlier than participants who got to taste the chocolate cookies, t(44) = 6.03, d = 1.80, and 12 minutes earlier than participants in a control condition without the tasting part of the experiment, t(44) = 6.88, d = 2.04.   The ego-depletion effect in this study is gigantic.  Thus, flair might be important to create conditions that can produce strong effects, but once a researcher with flair has created such an experiment, others should be able to replicate it.  It doesn’t take flair to bake chocolate cookies, put a plate of radishes on a table, and to instruct participants how a figure tracing task works and to ring a bell when they no longer want to work on the task.  In fact, Baumeister et al. (1998) proudly reported that even high school students were able to replicate the study in a science project.

As this article went to press, we were notified that this experiment had been independently replicated by Timothy J. Howe, of Cole Junior High School in East Greenwich, Rhode Island, for his science fair project. His results conformed almost exactly to ours, with the exception that mean persistence in the chocolate condition was slightly (but not significantly) higher than in the control condition. These converging results strengthen confidence in the present findings.

If ego-depletion effects can be replicated in a school project, it undermines the idea that successful results require special skills.  Moreover, the meta-analysis shows that flair is little more than selective publishing of significant results, a conclusion that is confirmed by Baumeister’s response to my bias analyses. “you may think that not reporting the less successful studies is wrong, but that is how the field works.” (Roy Baumeister, personal email communication).

In conclusion, future researchers interested in self-regulation have a choice. They can believe in ego-depletion and ignore the statistical evidence of selection bias, failed replications, and admissions of suppressed evidence, and conduct further studies with existing paradigms and sample sizes and see what they get.  Alternatively, they may go to the other extreme and dismiss the entirely literature.

“If all the field’s prior work is misleading, underpowered, or even fraudulent, there is no need to pay attention to it.” (Baumeister, p. 4).

This meta-analysis offers a third possibility by trying to find replicable results that can provide the basis for the planning of future studies that provide better tests of ego-depletion theory.  I do not suggest to directly replicate any past study.  Rather, I think future research should aim for a strong demonstration of ego-depletion.  To achieve this goal, future studies should maximize statistical power in four ways.

First, use a strong experimental manipulation by comparing a control condition with a combination of multiple ego-depletion paradigms to maximize the standardized effect size.

Second, the study should use multiple, reliable, and valid measures of ego-depletion to minimize the influence of random and systematic measurement error in the dependent variable.

Third, the study should use a within-subject design or at least a pre-post design to control for individual differences in performance on the ego-depletion tasks to further reduce error variance.

Fourth, the study should have a sufficient sample size to make a non-significant result theoretically important.  I suggest planning for a standard error of .10 standard deviations.  As a result, any effect size greater than d = .20 will be significant, and a non-significant result if consistent with the null-hypothesis that the effect size is less than d = .20.

The next replicability report will show which path ego-depletion researcher have taken.  Even if they follow Baumeister’s suggestion to continue with business as usual, they can no longer claim that they were unaware of the consequences of going down this path.

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More blogs on replicability.

 

 

Replicability Ranking of Psychology Departments

Evaluations of individual researchers, departments, and universities are common and arguably necessary as science is becoming bigger. Existing rankings are based to a large extent on peer-evaluations. A university is ranked highly if peers at other universities perceive it to produce a steady stream of high-quality research. At present the most widely used objective measures rely on the quantity of research output and on the number of citations. These quantitative indicators of research quality work are also heavily influenced by peers because peer-review controls what gets published, especially in journals with high rejection rates, and peers decide what research they cite in their own work. The social mechanisms that regulate peer-approval are unavoidable in a collective enterprise like science that does not have a simple objective measure of quality (e.g., customer satisfaction ratings, or accident rates of cars). Unfortunately, it is well known that social judgments are subject to many biases due to conformity pressure, self-serving biases, confirmation bias, motivated biases, etc. Therefore, it is desirable to complement peer-evaluations with objective indicators of research quality.

Some aspects of research quality are easier to measure than others. Replicability rankings focus on one aspect of research quality that can be measured objectively, namely the replicability of a published significant result. In many scientific disciplines such as psychology, a successful study reports a statistically significant result. A statistically significant result is used to minimize the risk of publishing evidence for an effect that does not exist (or even goes in the opposite direction). For example, a psychological study that shows effectiveness of a treatment for depression would have to show that the effect in the study reveals a real effect that can be observed in other studies and in real patients if the treatment is used for the treatment of depression.

In a science that produces thousands of results a year, it is inevitable that some of the published results are fluke findings (even Toyota’s break down sometimes). To minimize the risk of false results entering the literature, psychology like many other sciences, adopted a 5% error rate. By using a 5% as the criterion, psychologists ensured that no more than 5% of results are fluke findings. With thousands of results published in each year, this still means that more than 50 false results enter the literature each year. However, this is acceptable because a single study does not have immediate consequences. Only if these results are replicated in other studies, findings become the foundation of theories and may influence practical decisions in therapy or in other applications of psychological findings (at work, in schools, or in policy). Thus, to outside observers it may appear safe to trust published results in psychology and to report about these findings in newspaper articles, popular books, or textbooks.

Unfortunately, it would be a mistake to interpret a significant result in a psychology journal as evidence that the result is probably true.  The reason is that the published success rate in journals has nothing to do with the actual success rate in psychological laboratories. All insiders know that it is common practice to report only results that support a researcher’s theory. While outsiders may think of scientists as neutral observers (judges), insiders play the game of lobbyist, advertisers, and self-promoters. The game is to advance one’s theory, publish more than others, get more citations than others, and win more grant money than others. Honest reporting of failed studies does not advance this agenda. As a result, the fact that psychological studies report nearly exclusively success stories (Sterling, 1995; Sterling et al., 1995) tells outside observers nothing about the replicability of a published finding and the true rate of fluke findings could be 100%.

This problem has been known for over 50 years (Cohen, 1962; Sterling, 1959). So it would be wrong to call the selective reporting of successful studies an acute crisis. However, what changed is that some psychologists have started to criticize the widely accepted practice of selective reporting of successful studies (Asendorpf et al., 2012; Francis, 2012; Simonsohn et al., 2011; Schimmack, 2012; Wagenmakers et al., 2011). Over the past five years, psychologists, particularly social psychologists, have been engaged in heated arguments over the so-called “replication crisis.”

One group argues that selective publishing of successful studies occurred, but without real consequences on the trustworthiness of published results. The other group argues that published results cannot be trusted unless they have been successfully replicated. The problem is that neither group has objective information about the replicability of published results.  That is, there is no reliable estimate of the percentage of studies that would produce a significant result again, if a representative sample of significant results published in psychology journals were replicated.

Evidently, it is not possible to conduct exact replication studies of all studies that have been published in the past 50 years. Fortunately, it is not necessary to conduct exact replication studies to obtain an objective estimate of replicability. The reason is that replicability of exact replication studies is a function of the statistical power of studies (Sterling et al., 1995). Without selective reporting of results, a 95% success rate is an estimate of the statistical power of the studies that achieved this success rate. Vice versa, a set of studies with average power of 50% is expected to produce a success rate of 50% (Sterling, et al., 1995).

Although selection bias renders success rates uninformative, the actual statistical results provide valuable information that can be used to estimate the unbiased statistical power of published results. Although selection bias inflates effect sizes and power, Brunner and Schimmack (forcecoming) developed and validated a method that can correct for selection bias. This method makes it possible to estimate the replicability of published significant results on the basis of the original reported results. This statistical method was used to estimate the replicabilty of research published by psychology departments in the years from 2010 to 2015 (see Methodology for details).

The averages for the 2010-2012 period (M = 59) and the 2013-2015 period (M = 61) show only a small difference, indicating that psychologists have not changed their research practices in accordance with recommendations to improve replicability in 2011  (Simonsohn et al., 2011). For most of the departments the confidence intervals for the two periods overlap (see attached powergraphs). Thus, the more reliable average across all years is used for the rankings, but the information for the two time periods is presented as well.

There are no obvious predictors of variability across departments. Private universities are at the top (#1, #2, #8), the middle (#24, #26), and at the bottom (#44, #47). European universities can also be found at the top (#4, #5), middle (#25) and bottom (#46, #51). So are Canadian universities (#9, #15, #16, #18, #19, #50).

There is no consensus on an optimal number of replicability.  Cohen recommended that researchers should plan studies with 80% power to detect real effects. If 50% of studies tested real effects with 80% power and the other 50% tested a null-hypothesis (no effect = 2.5% probability to replicate a false result again), the estimated power for significant results would be 78%. The effect on average power is so small because most of the false predictions produce a non-significant result. As a result, only a few studies with low replication probability dilute the average power estimate. Thus, a value greater than 70 can be considered broadly in accordance with Cohen’s recommendations.

It is important to point out that the estimates are very optimistic estimates of the success rate in actual replications of theoretically important effects. For a representative set of 100 studies (OSC, Science, 2015), Brunner and Schimmack’s statistical approach predicted a success rate of 54%, but the success rate in actual replication studies was only 37%. One reason for this discrepancy could be that the statistical approach assumes that the replication studies are exact, but actual replications always differ in some ways from the original studies, and this uncontrollable variability in experimental conditions posses another challenge for replicability of psychological results.  Before further validation research has been completed, the estimates can only be used as a rough estimate of replicability. However, the absolute accuracy of estimates is not relevant for the relative comparison of psychology departments.

And now, without further ado, the first objective rankings of 51 psychology departments based on the replicability of published significant results. More departments will be added to these rankings as the results become available.

Rank University 2010-2015 2010-2012 2013-2015
1 U Penn 72 69 75
2 Cornell U 70 67 72
3 Purdue U 69 69 69
4 Tilburg U 69 71 66
5 Humboldt U Berlin 67 68 66
6 Carnegie Mellon 67 67 67
7 Princeton U 66 65 67
8 York U 66 63 68
9 Brown U 66 71 60
10 U Geneva 66 71 60
11 Northwestern U 65 66 63
12 U Cambridge 65 66 63
13 U Washington 65 70 59
14 Carleton U 65 68 61
15 Queen’s U 63 57 69
16 U Texas – Austin 63 63 63
17 U Toronto 63 65 61
18 McGill U 63 72 54
19 U Virginia 63 61 64
20 U Queensland 63 66 59
21 Vanderbilt U 63 61 64
22 Michigan State U 62 57 67
23 Harvard U 62 64 60
24 U Amsterdam 62 63 60
25 Stanford U 62 65 58
26 UC Davis 62 57 66
27 UCLA 61 61 61
28 U Michigan 61 63 59
29 Ghent U 61 58 63
30 U Waterloo 61 65 56
31 U Kentucky 59 58 60
32 Penn State U 59 63 55
33 Radboud U 59 60 57
34 U Western Ontario 58 66 50
35 U North Carolina Chapel Hill 58 58 58
36 Boston University 58 66 50
37 U Mass Amherst 58 52 64
38 U British Columbia 57 57 57
39 The University of Hong Kong 57 57 57
40 Arizona State U 57 57 57
41 U Missouri 57 55 59
42 Florida State U 56 63 49
43 New York U 55 55 54
44 Dartmouth College 55 68 41
45 U Heidelberg 54 48 60
46 Yale U 54 54 54
47 Ohio State U 53 58 47
48 Wake Forest U 51 53 49
49 Dalhousie U 50 45 55
50 U Oslo 49 54 44
51 U Kansas 45 45 44